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Concerned about a child's lack of progress...

Discussion in 'Primary' started by lillipad, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Ok there are a few in my class who don't seem to move themselves on in their learning, but there is one child i'm very worried about. I can say something 3 times to this child and they just don't understand what i'm saying... Even if it's as simple as "Write a word beginning with S" and my TA told them about 5 or 6 times today what to write and they still wrote something totally different. Help???? My senco doesn't have the time at the moment to look at them and so am just looking for ways to cope until she can!
     
  2. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Ok there are a few in my class who don't seem to move themselves on in their learning, but there is one child i'm very worried about. I can say something 3 times to this child and they just don't understand what i'm saying... Even if it's as simple as "Write a word beginning with S" and my TA told them about 5 or 6 times today what to write and they still wrote something totally different. Help???? My senco doesn't have the time at the moment to look at them and so am just looking for ways to cope until she can!
     
  3. greta444

    greta444 New commenter

    I have had a few of these in my time. Sounds like an audio processing problem. Do a dyslexis test to see what their audio processing is like, refer to speech therapy, they may not do much as they have other children who can't actually speak on their hands. Understanding and processing comes further down on their list. Practise giving the child increasingly complex instructions but starting very simple and building up very gradually.
    A dyslexia programme called 'Turnabout' may help.
    Very frustrating, good luck
     
  4. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Ok interesting you pointed straight to dyslexia, he does have trouble writing, but he always seems very vacant and will talk about something totally different to the topic. But when he does write something, it is clear and usually readable if not massive letters etc. It's as simple as "Write this sentence down..." and he needs it said out loud about 10 or so times and even then he struggles to not omit whole words?!
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

  6. greta444

    greta444 New commenter

    I didn't say it was dyslexia but part of dyslexia screening may identify an auditory processing problem.
     
  7. I think you should ask the parents to refer the child to a child development paedetrician who could look at the whole child and work out what's going on.

    If it's bad as you describe then it sounds unlikely that it'll be something simple that you can help him with in school. He needs to be looked at by professionals.

    Also raise your concerns more strongly with the SENCO.

    He's not able to learn. Everyone should be very worried.

    And he needs to be on the list to see the Educational Psychologist.
     
  8. chocolateworshipper

    chocolateworshipper Occasional commenter

    Just a little tip. I have a child that desperately needs an Ed Psych visit. The SENCO warned me that due to the budget cuts, they will only come in when they have evidence showing WHY they should come in. I had to do 3 written observations of the child (writing down EVERYTHING they did over a 10 minute period). Might save a bit of time in the long run if you do this. Good luck :)
     
  9. GARDEN24

    GARDEN24 New commenter

    If it has just recently happened might be something going on at home???
     
  10. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    [​IMG]Yes - what I did at the weekend - my mother used to despair every Monday evening that I had spent another Monday morning doing that. I find myself wishing that my children were given the opportunity to do that. There doesn't seem to be any writing without hours and days preparing for it, then the child has to have ideas that fit with whatever the week's requirement or genre is leading to writer's block as early as age 5!! There seems to be a degree level approach to writing in KS1 and KS2 with planning, and note taking, and whatnot. Does the National Curriculum demand this at this early stage of putting pen to paper?
    Sorry that does not really answer your question OP. Any more luck with finding out what is / isn't going on with this child?
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    because I'm teaching a class full time and running interventions before and after school and in my lunchbreak [​IMG]
     
  12. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    It's not you though is it? [​IMG] Anyhow I can imagine you saying bring the child round to my house at 10pm tonight and I'll take a look.
    Yes, the title SEN co-ordinator is a bit of a misnomer where it is the SENCO themselves doing the interventions in addition to a full teaching timetable. Sounds like SEN funding is rather tight these days!
     
  13. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Thanks for the many replies. I'm not sure why he hasn't been flagged up before, possible a case of slipping through the net and covering it up quite well by staying quiet and copying!
     
  14. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Primary SENCOs have always worked like this. While some get regular time out of the classroom in general most are trying hard to keep too many balls in the air in too few hours with too few hands.
     

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