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complex conjugate notation

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by David Getling, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. David Getling

    David Getling Senior commenter

    The thread on curly x reminded me of one notation used by both IB and Edexcel that really annoys me: using superscript * instead of a bar over the top. I imagine this harks back to the days when you needed to use Latex to print the proper notation.

    Using * is very clumsy and inelegant, so it's about time school text books did what universities have always done. At any rate, I encourage my students to use the proper notation.

    Another thing I've seen is the use of ]x,y[ instead of (x,y) for open limits. Is this another school foible, or is it a European abomination - like switching the use of the comma and decimal point?
     
  2. David Getling

    David Getling Senior commenter

    The thread on curly x reminded me of one notation used by both IB and Edexcel that really annoys me: using superscript * instead of a bar over the top. I imagine this harks back to the days when you needed to use Latex to print the proper notation.

    Using * is very clumsy and inelegant, so it's about time school text books did what universities have always done. At any rate, I encourage my students to use the proper notation.

    Another thing I've seen is the use of ]x,y[ instead of (x,y) for open limits. Is this another school foible, or is it a European abomination - like switching the use of the comma and decimal point?
     
  3. The complex conjugation notation has never bothered me much - * and overbar have both been around a long time. So has j instead of i for one of the square roots of -1.
    I have to admit, however, that I find the notation ]x,y[ instead of (x,y) rather hard to take in.
     

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