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Completely selfish post - reading age tests!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by Leapyearbaby64, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    I had some confident readers in my class last year who were "set back' by the Salford test which placed them on pink books at the start of term in Sept. In January when they had a second Salford, they were put on the green books. Now this says to me that the test is not right for that lower level of readers. But now it looks like they have made all the progress in the beginning of Y1 rather than reflecting where they were leaving R. Is there a more appropriate reading test for the way we teach reading now?
     
  2. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    I had some confident readers in my class last year who were "set back' by the Salford test which placed them on pink books at the start of term in Sept. In January when they had a second Salford, they were put on the green books. Now this says to me that the test is not right for that lower level of readers. But now it looks like they have made all the progress in the beginning of Y1 rather than reflecting where they were leaving R. Is there a more appropriate reading test for the way we teach reading now?
     
  3. Locating existing suitable reading tests is always a difficult challenge.
    I don't think that you have to allow the test results, however, to determine a certain 'level' of reading book - especially where you know your pupils well and know which reading books match their level and skills.
    So, there may be some usefulness in the Salford test - especially if, as a school, you have used the same test over the years (thus, you can compare results from one year to the next to see if there are any patterns).
    You could also make a simple, professional 'note' to keep alongside the Salford Test, or any other in-school tests, as to your findings of the results compared to your knowledge of the pupils and your findings on other kinds of tests.
    Then, you can use your professional judgement accordingly. If you could see clearly that the pupils concerned should not be on a certain level despite previous acceptance of the 'matchings', then you need to raise this with colleagues and have a discussion about it.
    The teaching profession's 'understanding' of the processes involved with reading, and the teaching of reading, are changing over the decades. There is a great, and growing, understanding of the parts played by alphabetic code knowledge and decoding words relative to level of 'oral comprehension' (as shown by the Simple View of Reading Model).
    This has implications for interpreting various tests that teachers have used traditionally.
     

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