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Combining teaching and international sport.

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by AKD777, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. Hi,
    I am looking to get some advice on my current position. I am in my third year of teaching but I playing sport at an international level.
    The school have been supportive in the past giving me days off (unpaid) to travel and play my sport but I have now been told by my HT that he will not be granting me any more days off and i should consider my commitments and make a decisionly accordingly.
    What is frustarting is that when I joined the school, I made it clear of my situation and the demands of my other commitments. I feel like I am being forced out of the school because I cant commit fully to his school.
    I do enjoy teaching but I only get one sports career!
     
  2. Hi,
    I am looking to get some advice on my current position. I am in my third year of teaching but I playing sport at an international level.
    The school have been supportive in the past giving me days off (unpaid) to travel and play my sport but I have now been told by my HT that he will not be granting me any more days off and i should consider my commitments and make a decisionly accordingly.
    What is frustarting is that when I joined the school, I made it clear of my situation and the demands of my other commitments. I feel like I am being forced out of the school because I cant commit fully to his school.
    I do enjoy teaching but I only get one sports career!
     
  3. I think you need to make a choice - if the school can no longer manage the inconvenience of having you go off to sporting fixtures or they feel your level of fame doesn't compensate them sufficiently for the inconvenience then they don't have to give you the time off.
    If you don't want to give up your sporting career then don't - find another job with more flexible working, play your sport and then when you have retired from international sport go back to teaching if you enjoy it.
    Sorry if this sounds a bit harsh but sacrifices need to be made somewhere.
     
  4. Gardening Leaves

    Gardening Leaves New commenter

    I think it may be worth taking specialist advice on this. It may be that if you made this clear when you were interviewed and appointed on that basis then that is the contract that exists between you and your employer. I suppose it would depend on whether the level of commitment had changed since you were appointed - but let an expert look at it.
     
  5. Thats a real shame for the school to change their stance. Perhaps another school will find that the benefits of having an international athlete on the pay roll outweigh having to get our unpaid leave covered.
     
  6. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    How much time each year are you talking of? I'd need to know that before offering an experienced headteacher's view of whether it's reasonable of you to expect the time or not.
     
  7. frustum

    frustum Lead commenter

    Also when?
    (Occasional Fridays in order to get to weekend events might mean a 0.8 contract would solve the problem, or strategic timetabling might reduce it, but I'm guessing it's more likely to be blocks of time?)
     
  8. I am currently taking about 10 days off a year. They are mostly Fridays and Mondays with the odd Thursday if i have to travel further.
    I have asked about part time but this not an option.
     
  9. Gardening Leaves

    Gardening Leaves New commenter

    I raised this as a query with my law tutor as I am currently 'doing' an Employment Law module. As well as being a tutor, she's also a solicitor. She said that it would depend on the conversation you had with the Head when you were appointed. If you had a full and frank conversation about precisely what would be involved and the Head offered you the job and you accepted on that basis, with full knowledge to both parties of the details, then that is the basis on which both parties entered the contract and the Head cannot now renage on it without being in breach of the contract. This is irrespective of what your written contract may say: a contract in Employment Law does not have to be written down. If the Head made an agreement with you that he/she now finds inconvenient, that is tough: you both made and agreed the terms.
    If, however, you were vague about the commitment or it has changed since you were appointed, then the Head would be within his/her rights to challenge you for breaching (or wanting to breach) the agreed contract.
    Really, you need to have an appointment with a specialist employment lawyer to sort this one, if you think the former scenario is what took place. If the latter is the situation, you have difficult decisions to make.
    I know of a school with a teacher in a similar situation in which departmental colleagues have rallied round to volunteer cover and continuity for the classes on the relevant days. It's very generous of them to voluntarily give up free lessons to cover but they are happy to support with the Olympics in sight. I can understand your Head's concern for the impact on the same classes of your regular absence. Perhaps he/she may be more willing to accommodate you if you could suggest a potential solution to her problem?
     

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