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Colleague resigns During Summer

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by jago123, Aug 14, 2018.

  1. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    Although neither of those decisions were ones the LA had the power to take anyway! It's not up to the LA, it's a governing body decision.
     
    nomad and Startedin82 like this.
  2. Sundaytrekker

    Sundaytrekker Star commenter

    I would say that headteacher should have stuck to standard resignation dates the same as everyone else. There is nothing to stop a head being away for a month in the summer, if they wish. I know a number who regularly have long holidays including back before mobile phones were common. So, the school might burn down when I’m on my holiday? As long as the head has made arrangements for a caretaker, deputy, chair of God’s etc to be contactable then they are allowed not to be there. One head I worked for as deputy left at Christmas and was handed in the keys and was paid till 31st Dec despite leaving the country.
     
    Startedin82 likes this.
  3. Startedin82

    Startedin82 Established commenter

    Very true - more than 20 years ago when I was a Deputy Head - we had a serious fire (arson) at my then school. It was August and my HT was blissfully unaware - camping in France. I was back from holiday when it happened and took the 5 am phone call from the Local Authority. I had to deal with everything. It doesn't have to be the HT - there wasn't a lot he could do!
     
  4. Flanks

    Flanks Established commenter

    I don't think there is any need to have a go at the HT or an inquisition about why staff are leaving. His response seems perfectly reasonable at the end of a long year when you discover that a member of staff has already handed you costs and an extra recruitment job for next year.

    We all hope that the teacher had no immediate sudden change in circumstances necessitating their decision.

    Assuming no such thing has occurred then it is simply gross professional discourtesy to wait for a holiday to start before resigning, avoiding any opportunity to apologise and acknowledge the problem it gives a school.

    My neighbour is a head and had this happen to him last year, first day after school broke up. The last day of term the teacher even took time to say they were looking forward to next year! Just like this head, his first response was to give to give a professional 'screw you' as a reference, but after cooling off he just let HR handle it.

    No need for inquisitions on a HT in my opinion. Far too easy to blame the boss when we aren't the ones carrying the responsibility.
     
  5. meggyd

    meggyd Senior commenter

    Didn't the teacher have some kind of appraisal during the academic year? Isn't there normally a question about aspirations, concerns and future progression? Shouldn't someone have picked something up and raised concerns? Line manager perhaps? Actually the sudden resignation is better than the teacher going off sick with stress in September meaning that the school incurs more costs in sick pay and supply costs plus the uncertainty of whether the teacher is actually going to resign and the consequences for pupil progress in his/her classes. The action of the head shows a disregard for staff welfare and a lack of understanding of an employer's duty of care.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2018
    henrypm0 likes this.
  6. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    Which bit of the employer's duty of care do you think the head doesn't understand?

    http://www.acas.org.uk/index.aspx?articleid=3751
     
    nomad, install and Startedin82 like this.
  7. install

    install Star commenter

    You may not mean to, but it seems you may have it in for the ht, no matter what they do. And your logic seems flawed to me. On the one hand you try to argue how awfully supported this teacher seems to be, and then on the other try to claim they have saved the school money? The employee broke the contract here - not the ht as you seem to be trying to argue anywhich way...
     
  8. meggyd

    meggyd Senior commenter

    Read the acas definition. Ensuring staff do not work excessive hours. Providing channels of communication to raise concerns.
     
  9. meggyd

    meggyd Senior commenter

    No. I feel the head has not behaved properly. The point about the money is valid. Those who argue that the head is now dealing with a real problem ought to consider how the scenario might have ended if the teacher had struggled on. You are not addressing the real issue. Why would an exemplary employee of eleven years who has never given cause for concern and who in most schools would have some kind of friendly professional relationship with a head feel obliged to behave in this dramatic way? It doesn't make sense.
     
  10. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Like an increasing number of threads on TES this weekend! :rolleyes:
     
    nomad, install and peapicker like this.
  11. install

    install Star commenter

    To be frank - your post and approach is not making sense to me. In my experience, quite a few teachers have just switched jobs the moment they got the chance. Are you sure you are not slightly envious of the employee getting a chance to do another job so fast?.
     
  12. meggyd

    meggyd Senior commenter

     
  13. meggyd

    meggyd Senior commenter

    You haven't answered the question.
     
  14. install

    install Star commenter

    You would need to ask the employee - only they can know that. But to cast blame, not knowing, seems odd to me.
     
    Flanks likes this.
  15. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    And where does the OP say that those things didn't happen or that OP doesn't understand them?
     
    nomad likes this.
  16. sparkleghirl

    sparkleghirl Star commenter

    The OP did previously want to rescind an offer to a newly contracted staff member when she turned out to be pregnant, but after sage advice decided this was not the way to go.

    I think perhaps the OP's instincts don't quite match either teachers' expectations or the legislation. In this case it's a teacher who has not complied with regulations and the OP's initial reaction was to lash out. Let's hope that he sees sense and focuses on ensuring that remaining staff have reasons to want to stay.
     
  17. jago123

    jago123 Established commenter

    Further to my post just under two weeks ago, I have advertised the role, received a number of applicants and have completed the initial shortlisting where I am interviewing 4 candidates this week. All are available to start as soon as possible, as they are not currently employed by a school. I’m hoping to have filled the vacancy by the time we return in September.
     
  18. Flanks

    Flanks Established commenter

    Good luck!

    Although, I often think teacher recruitment is like choosing a builder to do work on your house. If they can start immediately it might be lucky, but more often a reason to walk away!
     
    Pomza and caterpillartobutterfly like this.
  19. jago123

    jago123 Established commenter

    I’ve interviewed two of the four candidates and so far out of those, there is only one of those candidates who I am considering for the role- I am interviewing the other two candidates tomorrow and I hope to make an appointment on Friday.
     
  20. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    WOW!
    Most schools (that I know of, so granted actually very few!) would interview all of them on the same day and make the decision that day as well. Getting governors and SLT all in for three days seems a luxury!
     
    Startedin82 likes this.

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