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Classroom managment for a newbie

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by Norwegia, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. Hello! Have recently signed up for supply and hoping (!) to get my first day next week. Really just looking for a few ideas on how to set the tone re classroom management. Do you get them lined up outside? How tough are most of you? Behaviour management is not my strong point so looking for some ideas [​IMG]
    Thanks!
    PS: Do acadmies tend to pay to scale????
     
  2. Hello! Have recently signed up for supply and hoping (!) to get my first day next week. Really just looking for a few ideas on how to set the tone re classroom management. Do you get them lined up outside? How tough are most of you? Behaviour management is not my strong point so looking for some ideas [​IMG]
    Thanks!
    PS: Do acadmies tend to pay to scale????
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    No-one else has replied and this is so difficult to give an answer to, as it very much depends on the individual school. I always try and keep to the 'normal routine' and find this varies enormously.
    Ensure the children understand who is 'in charge' though.
    As to pay that's also variable these days.
     
  4. Mrs-Pip

    Mrs-Pip New commenter

    Are you primary or secondary?
     
  5. No-one tends to pay to scale any more, academies or otherwise.
     
  6. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    Hello
    I have found that some schools will want you to line the class up outside the room and the children will know the routine and wait outside the door of the classroom waiting to be asked inside. Other schools allow the children to come in without lining up. If I have time before the first lesson, I will ask another teacher what the routine is. You may be able to decide if you would like them to line up or not.

    Regarding being tough, I am not an expert, but what I would say is that when I started doing supply I think I was too pleasant. I now know that despite my good intentions, students may perceive this as being weak.
    However, I start by saying good morning and telling them my name and I write it on the board. I think you have to appear to be tough without appearing cruel.What I mean by tough is that you will do whatever it takes to have the class doing what you want them to do - namely, working on the work that has been set for them. Get the class settled and on task as quickly as you can. It is not always easy since you need a minute or two to look over the lesson plan. While you are doing that, the children can be writing the title of the work, date etc in their books. This is all very difficult since you may be moving from room to room and have to get the information up on the board quickly in order for them to be able to start. Coats off, bags on the floor under the table and pens out ready to start. Let them know you know the routine. Take a few spare pens with you just in case. Ask a few reliable students to help you. Ask them to give out text books, exercise books, or paper.
    Be business like - you are there to a a job and they are there to learn. Just because their regular teacher is not there does not give them an excuse to waste their time and also you and the class can enjoy your time together. I usually tell the class that their teacher has set work and expects the work to be done - in other words, business as usual. I do think teachers get annoyed when work has been set and isn't done and rightly so. Saying that, there is no easy path, and some students will try and get out of working just because they have a supply teacher.
    Set our your expectations at the start and let them know that you are in charge and that you set the rules. You may have 3 main rules. In any event, the school will have rules for behaviour which they will give you in some sort of supply pack. For example, I always state that I expect them to work to the best of their ability and to follow the instructions left by their teacher. If I am talking then I expect there to be no talking. If someone else is giving a contribtuion then there is no talking. If you give them high expectations then they will know you are a professional and that you care about them. I can only say what I do and what has worked for me.
    If there is any misbehaviour, I usually give a warning. If I have to give a second warning and if the behaviour is disrupting the class, I will send for a student support officer or whatever the system the school has for back up. It is not always easy to get names for detentions since you do not know the students, but if you have a TA in with you they can help with names and then find out what you need to do to have someone set a detention or other sanction for serious misbehaviour.
    Finally, read the threads on the behaviour forums for advice. You will pick up a lot of useful information there and TES advertise webinars and other useful information that may be of interest to you.
    You will also find the behaviour varies from school to school. The schools with high expectations for their students will be the easiest ones to work in. The schools where the teachers are not supported properly will be the hardest ones to work in regarding behaviour. You will hopefully be able to be in a position after some time to choose which schools to go to if you so wish. Some people like working in challenging schools and thrive on it.
    Let us know how you get on.


     
  7. Thanks for your replies and especially Pepper5 for such a detailed one [​IMG] I think your basic rules seem pretty fair and couldn't really be questioned or challenged by the majority of students. one of the schools I hope to work for directly has issued me with their supply staff handbook which is great but the agencies haven't been able to give me anything yet,
    my last full time teaching job was some time ago and to put it bluntly - almost made me quit teaching for good. As a result my confidence in my own abilities is pretty low so I'm worried but also interested to see how I get on with supply.
    At least with supply you don't hvae to go back in the next day if it's truly awful!
    Anyway hoping to get some work this coming week so will keep you posted. Off to dig out some suitable clothes now [​IMG]
     

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