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Classroom management(teacher from asia)

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by topina, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. topina

    topina New commenter

    Dear All,
    I will be doing PGCE secondary MFL this year. One thing really worries me is as a qualified teacher from Asia and didn't have too much experience in the secondary settings here in the U.K. I am afriad that I might not able to control the class if there is any behaviour problem happening! Can anyone give me some advice e.g. some books that might be very useful for dealing the issues in the classroom? The previous school I was working at, the teacher just simply asked the student "out" and I am not sure, as a PGCE student, would that be appropriate to do things like that in front of the class teacher? The culture difference thing really worries me and I know only if I can get control of the class so I will be able to deliver any effective lesson. Any advice would be appreciated!

    Thanks a lot!!
     
  2. topina

    topina New commenter

    Dear All,
    I will be doing PGCE secondary MFL this year. One thing really worries me is as a qualified teacher from Asia and didn't have too much experience in the secondary settings here in the U.K. I am afriad that I might not able to control the class if there is any behaviour problem happening! Can anyone give me some advice e.g. some books that might be very useful for dealing the issues in the classroom? The previous school I was working at, the teacher just simply asked the student "out" and I am not sure, as a PGCE student, would that be appropriate to do things like that in front of the class teacher? The culture difference thing really worries me and I know only if I can get control of the class so I will be able to deliver any effective lesson. Any advice would be appreciated!

    Thanks a lot!!
     
  3. On my PGCE and that of my boyfriend's, we found books completely useless. The only way to do it was to look at other teachers in the school. Your experience will depend entirely on the kind of school you have. I imagine our students are more rowdy than yours, but I have no experience of Asian schools!

    Are you familiar with the UK?
     
  4. In Asia, teachers are revered. Teaching is a noble profession and pupils, parents and the rest of society treat you with deference. Behaviour management isn't usually a problem - indeed you have a greater problem in how to motivate passive learners! Also teaching methods tend to be more old fashioned, rote-learning, teacher-centred with a lot of teacher talk and copying from blackboards.
    So OP does need to change their strategy when teaching in UK. Get some experience observing lessons, and not just in a nice, suburban school with well-behaved kids! Get Sue Cowley's book on Getting *** to Behave for down to earth advice, and any book by Bill Rogers, who is a guru on behaviour management.
    What you must do is on the first day in a new school, you spell out your expectations, and sanctions that will be applied if they overstep the mark in accordance with school's behaviour policy. Remember you are the boss. Start off strict, and don't even allow low-level disturbances, and gradually ease up only when you have established yourself in their eyes as a no-nonsense teacher.
    It's often said 'Don't smile till Christmas!' It may be a bit extreme but there is more than a grain of truth.
     
  5. topina

    topina New commenter

    Hi, thanks for the reply!
    The problem is, I don't have too much experience in the UK, neither have I seen any Seconday teacher deliver the lesson(I've been in the primary school before,but I guess there's a lot of dIfference between primay and secondary settings) and that's why I am panic! I've been watching teachers.tv lately and tried to get some general picture how it could be. But, I doubt how much reality is there? Although I personally think classroom management should be part of the teaching skills anyway. But for the first time in my life, I have more concern about clsssroom management than to deliver the lessons! I guess you are right, there won't be any "Bible" to teach me how to manage the class, every class is different after all...
     
  6. topina

    topina New commenter

    And yes, the country where I came from teachers are much more respected by not only students but also parents. Although teenagers problems are more or less the same in the whole world, but I guess in general, students are much more obedient there...and also becasue of that, teachers normally don't need to think about how to make lessons "more interesting" in order to motivate students. The purpose of teaching is to get studnets pass the exams so teaching becomes exam-oriented. Of course this is totally diferent in the UK.!
     
  7. nemo.

    nemo. Occasional commenter

    Hi I worked in Asia and don't believe the BS that Asian kids are all respectful!

    It depends. Rural Thailand they won't spit at you like English kids can and do, but they will truant to smoke and have sex in bushes (the local teachers used to have to do patrol in the bushes with sticks!). In Bangkok they will swear at you in Thai and not much will be done. Standards have fallen all over the world in the facebook generation.

    state school kids in KL for example will use a knife to cut a groove in your car - all the way along - if you grant detention. I knew a lot of local teachers there and they told me some stories of woe

    What people do is compare state inner city comps with private international schools and say "foreign kids are so much better". Not fair as private or grammer uk schools have very small behaviour issues vs run down inner city schools. It's the parents etc that make the difference

    The other major different is that in UK unruly pupils are kept in school for "inclusion". I know one country that banishes naughty kids to another island! That's what we did when I was a kid in UK. If you hurt a teacher you were never seen again. We never spat at teachers, assaulted them, swore at them and misbehaved as we knew what would happen. Of course those kids usually ended up in prison etc so whether the old or the new system is better is a difficult question. But get used to kids who have no boundaries at home, who are allowed adult freedoms when they shouldn't have. They do take a more "social worker" approach and that is where OTTs generally suffer from stricter countries.


    The only thing is that on PGCE some tutors hate prior experience as they would rather have "raw material". I had prior overseas experience and made me more confident that helped in classroom management. You are doing the right thing to do a PGCE so enjoy it!
     
  8. Dear nemo
    Please don't use foul language, as I haven't.
    You are talking about experience in just two countries, Thailand and Malaysia, and I don't think your experience is typical. I know teachers who taught in those countries with very different experience. I am talking about Japan, South Korea, China, Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, Hong Kong, Macao, India, Pakistan.
    So if you are going to pontificate, just preface by saying 'in my limited experience'. There are people with a far wider experience than you.
    Alec
     

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