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Class book question

Discussion in 'Primary' started by ESLAB, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. ESLAB

    ESLAB New commenter

    Hi, I am a NQT teaching a mixed Year 1 and 2 class. We are reading James and the Giant Peach as our class book. My question is, how long each day does everybody read with their class? I am currently reading for 10 minutes before lunch whilst groups visit the loo and wash their hands and then 10 minutes at the end of the day, whilst groups collect their coats and book bags. Is this enough? Although we have very nearly finished, this is the first book since the beginning of the year. I do read religiously every day during these two times. It's just I am a great lover of books and had hoped to get through a lot more books over the course of the year. At this rate, I am only going to manage about 5!! How long do others read to their class? Thanks. PS Also, any recommendations for chapter books, other than Roald Dahl?
     
  2. ESLAB

    ESLAB New commenter

    Hi, I am a NQT teaching a mixed Year 1 and 2 class. We are reading James and the Giant Peach as our class book. My question is, how long each day does everybody read with their class? I am currently reading for 10 minutes before lunch whilst groups visit the loo and wash their hands and then 10 minutes at the end of the day, whilst groups collect their coats and book bags. Is this enough? Although we have very nearly finished, this is the first book since the beginning of the year. I do read religiously every day during these two times. It's just I am a great lover of books and had hoped to get through a lot more books over the course of the year. At this rate, I am only going to manage about 5!! How long do others read to their class? Thanks. PS Also, any recommendations for chapter books, other than Roald Dahl?
     
  3. littlelebowski

    littlelebowski New commenter

    Hi, I'm also an NQT teaching Year 1 and 2. I only teach mornings at the moment, and I make sure we have a story at snack time every day. This takes about 15 minutes. I had to scale down my ambitions a bit - I started on Charlie and the Chocolate Factory but I have a group of low ability Year 1's who were really struggling with the language. I have a huge mix of abilities and I now try to choose picture books that have adventurous language in them, as one of my main aims is to expose them to more complex words that they will then use in their writing. I also try to read them poetry by authors such as Michael Rosen, which they LOVE. I did find that they all liked the Mr. Majeika series, and these are chapter books. Horrid Henry was another one that the whole class were able to engage with, as well as Little Wolf's Book of Badness. Any tips on other books would be very welcome!
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I have just year 2. We do storytime at the end of the day on 4 days a week. They do have storytime on the other day, but it isn't with me. I have to say it is a sacred time and no-one goes to the loo or gets coats or faffs about or does anything except sit on the carpet and listen. That way I find it easier to build up an atmosphere and get them really engaged in the story. Storytime with me lasts for anything from 10 mins to 25 mins depending on what else is happening.

    First of all I read a 'Groovy Greeks' story. Can't remember the title but it was about building a pyramid and a nasty person getting buried. I read it to appeal to the boys, but none of the class really, really loved it. Was an ok book.

    Then I read a children's version (orchard myths I think is the publisher) of 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' and children joined in acting parts as we read. It would possibly be a bit ambitious for year 1, but the added acting helped year 2 access and enjoy it and they sometimes act out bits of it even now in Golden Time.

    Then it was towards half term and so I read lots of poems from 'The Day I fell Down the Toilet' which they loved and a variety of picture books. (They generally have picture books read on my PPA afternoon and that way they get the benefits of both chapter and picture stories.) The Day I Fell Down the Toilet is now falling apart as so many of them read it when they have time in the reading corner.

    I'm currently reading 'The Worst Witch' and they spend half the time giggling, gasping or clutching each other in anticipation of disaster.

    LOVE, LOVE Storytime!
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    How much of the book are they actually hearing if children are going in and out during the story ... I think the two 10 min sessions are fine but only if they are actually get to listen to the story.
     
  6. I don't like reading to the class if children are moving about and I doubt they're all following the story if they're not all in the same room. I would either get coats and bags ready (typed gags first - could work!) on their tables then ask them to come and sit on the carpet or read then ask them to get ready for home afterwards. It's amazing how quick they can be if they think they'll be late for hometime!
     
  7. ESLAB

    ESLAB New commenter

    You're right - it's not ideal at the moment! Although I have trained them well to be as quiet as mice washing hands/getting books etc, it does still mean that there is coming and going - definitely not ideal! I am going to try your idea of putting coats and bags on their table and then listening to the story - I think they would be quick at then picking up their things and getting ready to go home! What about actually how long you read (I know it sometimes depends on what else is happening) but in an ideal world? Thanks.
     
  8. littlelebowski

    littlelebowski New commenter

    I totally agree that it needs to be a sacred time when they are all listening. I have one very challenging child who will soon have a 1-2-1 TA. He often makes strange noises while I'm reading, and I always signal for him to go out of the class for a few minutes, as it's not fair on the others. At the moment, he does do this which always surprises me! My friend has just Year 2 and she reads for 10 minutes after break and then 10 minutes at the end of the day. The latter doesn't always happen though! A Year 1 colleague only reads for 10 minutes once a day (breaktime).
     
  9. I agree that the children should be actively listening to the story, otherwise what's the point?
    Am I alone in thinking that James and the Giant Peach is too advanced for Year 1 children? I wouldn't read it until Year 3 and then only if I had to. I don't like it as a story, it's quite dark. Year 1 should be listenng to a wealth of short stories in my opinion.
     
  10. ESLAB

    ESLAB New commenter

    Sorry, but I disagree with this view - my Year 1s are enjoying the story - every day they can't wait to hear what happens next...so, no, I don't think it's too advanced. (I read all of the Roald Dahl books to my own children between the ages of about 5 - 8). I also like the idea of short stories - by this, do you mean picture books which you can just read in a quick 5 mins? My main concern is HOW LONG to dedicate to reading every day - is there an optimum time or just whatever can be squeezed in?! Thanks.
     
  11. In an ideal world, I think there would be sacred time set aside every day for listening to a class story. In my Y3/4/5/6 class I'd go for 15 minutes of dedicated listening at the end of every day.
    However, in what is far from an ideal world, I just squeeze in whatever can be squeezed in!

     
  12. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    One of the benefits of reading to children is that they access a higher level of literature than they could read themselves. Most of my class could not have hoped to read A Midsummer Night's Dream, nor many of them The Worst Witch. But they can access the storyline if it is brought alive to them by good story reading. And keeping a story in mind and anticipating what might happen the next day is a very valuable skill and experience.

    But short story books with excellent colour pictures that children COULD read themselves also have a place in storytime. It is lovely to watch children sharing a book in the reading corner and using the expressions that have been modelled to them by the teacher when s/he read it.

    Funny and silly poems also have a place...some of my class can recite 'The Last Straw' from The Day I fell Down the Toilet off by heart, complete with expression and dramatic pauses. All of the class have their own favourite poem from the book. Hopefully such poems will stay with them for much of their lives.

    I try for 15 mins a day 3.00 - 3.15. Sometimes I manage almost half an hour (Yeps year 2 can sit on the carpet and enjoy a story for that long!) and sometimes just 5 mins or so. But definitely every single day and a good range of book types over the year.
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I agree I used The Lady of Shalott with reception ...they were enthralled
    I've also successfully used Macbeth, The Tempest, The Hobbit and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory with Y2. Last year we read Percy Jackson and the Lightening Thief (some children actually bought the books and read them at home with parents) alongside Greek Myths
     
  14. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Which do you use? I use these ones:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shakespeare-Stories-Book-Box-%C2%A363-84/dp/1408313057/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321115484&sr=1-3

    but am always on the lookout for more. I have used these as well, but don't like them quite so much:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Macbeth-Kids-Shakespeare-Can-Fun/dp/0887532799/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321115536&sr=1-1

    Would also love to know which Hobbit you use with year 2, just so I can copy!

    The Lady of Shallott? WOW! Might suggest that for a unit of work...
     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Yes I used this series as they are really accessible alongside the https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shakespeare-Animated-Tales-Taming-Macbeth/dp/B000KB6DV4/ref=sr_1_2?s=dvd&ie=UTF8&qid=1321115851&sr=1-2
    I bought this and we dipped but I didn't find it as accessible
    It started off from looking at the description of Smaug (Y2 love dragons)
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hobbit-There-Back-Again/dp/0007663706/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321115966&sr=1-2
    and some children read
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hobbit-Graphic-J-R-Tolkien/dp/0261102664/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321115966&sr=1-1

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lady-Shalott-Alfred-Lord-Tennyson/dp/0192723715/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321116299&sr=1-1
     
  16. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Mine like the animated tales as well and if one or other is on during golden time half the key stage end up watching it!

    Thank you for the links...off to spend more money!
     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think it's very easy to fall into the trap of thinking children can only enjoy/access books that they can read.
     
  18. littlelebowski

    littlelebowski New commenter

    BALSE, if your class can cope with it and they are enjoying it, you have definitely chosen the right book. [​IMG] The other staff have promised to pop in while I am reading now!!
     

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