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Christmas around the world

Discussion in 'Personal' started by TheoGriff, Nov 17, 2015.

  1. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    [​IMG]

    As the lights go on and the countdown to Christmas begins, I thought that people might like to tell us about different traditions in different countries.

    Here's my contribution - Christmas in Spain

    In Spain they have a few presents brought by Father Christmas on Christmas Day, but the main gift day is Epiphany, the 6th January

    In my town in S Spain the Kings arrive by helicopter, are greeted by the mayor (that's him in the photo, with the Kings and the helicopter pilot) before going off to the Town Square where the Royal Pages read out the letters from children to the Kings.

    View attachment 1283

    The mayor is the one in the middle without a crown.:)

    View attachment 1278

    Then, just as in all Spanish towns large and small, we have a procession on the evening of the 5th January, when the 3 kings parade around the town on floats, throwing sweets and the odd toy at spectators, prior to creeping up onto balconies (no chimneys in flats) to leave the presents for the children to find on the morning of the 6th.

    View attachment 1279

    Sweets galore being thrown! If they hit you, they can hurt. :(


    People decorate their balconies with models of the 3 Kings, although this balcony has got Father Christmas as well, covering all bets! :D

    View attachment 1280

    So what local traditions - in different parts of the UK as well as abroad - do you know about?

    Best wishes.

    .
     
    Primary_RE_teacher likes this.
  2. scienceteachasghost

    scienceteachasghost Lead commenter

    Bah Humbug! Its only November!
     
    grumpydogwoman likes this.
  3. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    Christmas in my house.

    Morning!

    Morning!
    Happy Christmas.
    Yes, Merry Christmas.
    What time's lunch?
     
  4. lindenlea

    lindenlea Star commenter

    We have the usual lights and lighting up ceremony and FC comes round on a sleigh with Round Table. No one seems to carol round the houses. We do have Carols in the Castle (outdoors) though accompanied by the Sally Army band where all the Telegraph readers try to get to shake hands with the MP. He actually seems a nice man with children in the local school - misguided though.. One unique event is the Duck Race on Boxing Day where you bet on numbered yellow plastic ducks and they are all tipped out of dustbins at the ford into the brook and they bob along through the park to the winning line. Hundreds of folk turn out for it on Boxing day as everyone is feeling stir crazy by then and want to get out of the house. The little ducks really look as if they're trying!
     
    marlin likes this.
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    Second attempt!

    As the lights go on and the countdown to Christmas begins, I thought that people might like to tell us about different traditions in different countries.

    Here's my contribution - Christmas in Spain

    In Spain they have a few presents brought by Father Christmas on Christmas Day, but the main gift day is Epiphany, the 6th January

    In my town in S Spain the Kings arrive by helicopter, are greeted by the mayor (that's him in the photo, with the Kings and the helicopter pilot) before going off to the Town Square where the Royal Pages read out the letters from children to the Kings.

    reyes helicoptero.jpg

    The mayor is the one in the middle without a crown.:)

    reyes 9.jpg

    Then, just as in all Spanish towns large and small, we have a procession on the evening of the 5th January, when the 3 kings parade around the town on floats, throwing sweets and the odd toy at spectators, prior to creeping up onto balconies (no chimneys in flats) to leave the presents for the children to find on the morning of the 6th.

    la_cabalgata_de_reyes_magos.png

    Sweets galore being thrown! If they hit you, they can hurt. :(


    People decorate their balconies with models of the 3 Kings, although this balcony has got Father Christmas as well, covering all bets! :D

    papa noel reyes magos.jpg

    So what local traditions - in different parts of the UK as well as abroad - do you know about?

    Best wishes.

    .
     
    marlin likes this.
  6. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    The Boxing Day Hunt.
     
  7. xena-warrior

    xena-warrior Star commenter

    Tree goes up the last Friday of term. Christmas Eve we stay in and eat an M&S readymeal so I don't have to cook, and I set the table for Christmas lunch. We take the presents round to Son1's. Christmas morning I get up at stupid o'clock and get the turkey going, then go back to bed for a bit. Dear Alfred and I have a light breakfast and open our presents, then he drives about and collects the non-drivers for lunch. Son2 collects his present from under the tree. We eat lunch, drink wine and play board games, and watch the video of the littlies opening their presents on Christmas morning. Then I offer tea, and everyone says No I couldn't I'm still stuffed from lunch, before clearing my tea-table like a plague of locusts.
    Then the drivers take everyone home and Dear Alfred and I collapse into a heap to watch the cornucopia of quality entertainment that Christmas TV offers, or read our Christmas books. I usually mop up any wine that remains in bottles and pass out around 11.
    Boxing day DA goes to watch a football match and Son1 visits the in-laws. Son2 has had enough socialising at this point and turns his phone off. I have a lovely day doing nothing. Then we usually go to visit my family for a few days, and either stay there for NYE, or come back if there's a home game, and babysit if required.
    Quiet, domestic and devoid of religious content. Just like me :)
     
    marlin likes this.
  8. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    :D

    Best wishes

    .
     
  9. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    Why do the Spanish kings string up Fr. Christmas?
     
    jomaimai likes this.
  10. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Christmas Eve - seafood platter for dinner, with nice bottle of fizz. Just the two of us.

    Christmas Day - open our presents with our breakfast (which is same as it is 364 other days of year). Ring my mother and do the usual spade-work of digging anything at all out of her by way of chat (same as it is every Sunday and any other time she phones me or vice versa).

    Snack at about 1pm.

    Eat meal at about 5pm as compromise on usual 7pm dinner time. Roast lamb, etc. Xmas pud and cream. Bottle of fizz.

    Evening: crash out in front of TV.

    Boxing day: visit my parents, fend off cake, etc.
     
  11. Mangleworzle

    Mangleworzle Star commenter

    Last week of November think about Christmas, plan presents and other purchases, congratulate self for being so ahead of the game this year.

    Do nothing about it until 2 days before Christmas and get everything done in a state of mild anxiety.
     
  12. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    Is that you? Horrors!
     
  13. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    I do as the Queen of Lydia directs.
     
  14. Lascarina

    Lascarina Star commenter

    Christmas in Sydney is a visit to the fish market at 4am on Christmas Eve. Christmas day is crabs, prawns, oysters, and fish on the Barbie for lunch and lots of dips in the pool in the back garden. They have already got a huge artificial tree up indoors that they showed me, together with the whole range of blue light flash function, yesterday morning on Skype. The grandboys told me they thought it was 'awesome'. And of course I agreed.:rolleyes:
     
    Noja likes this.
  15. Dragonlady30

    Dragonlady30 Star commenter

    I think this might be an urban myth but I was told the following a number of years ago.
    Japan is a country which enjoys celebrating, particularly if it is accompanied by a spending spree and so some far sighted entrepreneur with an eye on profit, wanted to cash in to this great celebration of the 'old world', Christmas. He did his research and spoke to many Western acquaintances but something got lost in translation as his stores sold many recognisable Christmas goods, but also included was a Father Christmas nailed to a cross. :eek:
     
    grumpydogwoman likes this.
  16. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    I shall have to play the game this year. The grandchildren are coming. I will have to MAKE A BLOODY EFFORT!!!!!
     
    marlin and Primary_RE_teacher like this.
  17. Primary_RE_teacher

    Primary_RE_teacher Occasional commenter

    Hi @TheoGriff. Good pieces of info. Merry Christmas if I do not speak to you soon.

    Ps. I am new today!
     
  18. xena-warrior

    xena-warrior Star commenter

    Yeh dead good, GDW! We have enjoyed the festive thingy much more since the grandchildren crawled round for it! Every year gets Christmasier and Christmasier!
     
    Mangleworzle likes this.
  19. Primary_RE_teacher

    Primary_RE_teacher Occasional commenter

    It sure does!:)
     
  20. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    OK Christmas in Germany.At least the traditional one with which I grew up with.

    For Germany the main celebration is on Christmas Eve Heiligabend (Holy night).
    Being traditionally a Lutheran country most families used to go to a service and when they returned some bells would tinkle in the living room and the family would go in to see the Christmas tree for the first time. Traditionally they would have real candles (before the days of safety awareness).

    Then the family would sit down to a traditional meal of goose and afterwards they would give and receive presents.

    They are 'big' on Christmas baking and used to enjoy making decorations and presents rather than buying them.
     

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