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Choir songs from 100 years ago!

Discussion in 'Music' started by Mrs Music, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. Mrs Music

    Mrs Music New commenter

    Next year is our school's centenary and as part of a concert/ arts evening to help commemorate the event, I thought that it would be good for the choir to perform some songs that may have been sung around a hundred years ago. So, any suggestions that might work well? There are around 30 in the choir and it is mixed boys and girls, aged 14-18.
    Many thanks!
     
  2. Mrs Music

    Mrs Music New commenter

    Next year is our school's centenary and as part of a concert/ arts evening to help commemorate the event, I thought that it would be good for the choir to perform some songs that may have been sung around a hundred years ago. So, any suggestions that might work well? There are around 30 in the choir and it is mixed boys and girls, aged 14-18.
    Many thanks!
     
  3. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Lead commenter

    They'd very likely have sung traditional songs like 'All things bright and beautiful', 'The Ash Grove', 'Men of Harlech' and so on. I have the old Daily Mail songbook which is full of such songs. You can often find them in charity or junk shops and they have well written piano accompaniments too. They might have sung bits of oratorios, G&S and other light songs.
     
  4. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    Something like Stanford's Songs of the Fleet (1910) perhaps? They need a male soloist (baritone, I think). Parry's Ode on the Nativity dates precisely from 1912. You might get away with Jerusalem, although it wasn't written until 1916.
    If you have an organ at the venue, and the choir are able to manage a little divisi of parts, I always think the piece most redolent of Edwardian England is the Evening Hymn by Henry Balfour Gardiner (John Eliot Gardiner's relative). Composed in 1908 when the Anglican church discovered Wagner:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAPM87OS_-c
     

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