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Chocolate Topic...

Discussion in 'Science' started by minky4uk44, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. <font size="2">Hello all!</font><font size="2">My primary school is doing a whole school topic on chocolate!! I have a few ideas of what I could do/teach but need help linking it to science and French.</font><font size="2">I&rsquo;ve thought about the reversible, irreversible change, making crispy buns, but I want a really good experiment to get the kids interested in. Can any one please help? </font><font size="2"> Any other ideas relating to maths, literacy, art, music, pe would be fab.</font><font size="2">Please help!!</font>
     
  2. <font size="2">Hello all!</font><font size="2">My primary school is doing a whole school topic on chocolate!! I have a few ideas of what I could do/teach but need help linking it to science and French.</font><font size="2">I&rsquo;ve thought about the reversible, irreversible change, making crispy buns, but I want a really good experiment to get the kids interested in. Can any one please help? </font><font size="2"> Any other ideas relating to maths, literacy, art, music, pe would be fab.</font><font size="2">Please help!!</font>
     
  3. http://everything2.com/user/grayfox/writeups/how+to+measure+the+speed+of+light


     
  4. Expt to measure the speed of light
     
  5. MarkS

    MarkS New commenter

    Hello!
    One thing you could try is showing that chocolate (or more correctly the fat, cocoa butter) has a number of different crystalline states that have different properties.
    In simple terms, when you cool down molten chocolate, it can solidify into different states which have different properties. The rate at which the chocolate is cooled deteremines a lot about the texture, melting point and 'mouth feel'.
    So...you could get the children to melt the chocolate (in a cooking room?) and try cooling it at different rates - in a fridge, in a freezer, at room temperature or submerged in warm water bath. They could then taste each chocolate (the best bit!) and compare the texture, taste etc to see which is best.
    Mark
     
  6. Robfreeman

    Robfreeman New commenter

    You could always look at how we taste, by comparing milk chocolate with dark chocolate.
     
  7. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Woiw,

    Everone is describing a BTEC topic that we do with year 10! And they say we are not dumbing down!
     

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