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Chinese School - BBC2 tv program "Are our kids tough enough?"

Discussion in 'English' started by sebedina, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. sebedina

    sebedina Occasional commenter

    PS I know the longer school day seems crazy, but to be honest I always do school work each night anyway. So perhaps if our school day finished at 5.00 pm then our weekends and evenings would be freed up. The chalk and talk method requires far less photocopying and spending hours creating resources and handouts from scratch.
     
  2. fineliner

    fineliner Occasional commenter

    chalk and talk and teacher led teaching won hands down

    No it didn't. The comparisons were for average scores - that doesn't tell us anything really. They only appeared to study maths, science, Mandarin, PE and English grammar...for a few weeks...there are many many problems with the Chinese methods.
     
  3. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    I do a lot of chalk and talk, but for obvious reasons I tend to keep quiet about it. I also do a lot of whole class discussions, and set more written work than others in the department. If I'm teaching a poem, for example, I usually read it and then ask pupils to discuss in pairs and come up with a question or comment. Then we discuss as a class. Notes for revision are usually me writing on the board and taking ideas from the class. Top sets often contribute most of the content, with me steering and prompting. There's more of me and less of them if they are low ability, but often they come up with a lot of good points, but need me to structure them, and encourage analysis. I often use chalk and talk at the beginning of lessons - especially in the afternoons with 'lively' classes. As with anything, too much of it will lead to pupils switching off, but as a settling activity, it works well, and sets them up to do some independent work.

    I know there are some pupils who prefer group work, but I get more complaints than appreciative comments when I choose to teach something that way. Sometimes we take groups to lectures, and many come away saying they would prefer that. I suspect that variety is the answer, but personally I think chalk and talk has its place.
     
  4. summerdayzz18

    summerdayzz18 New commenter

    I found the programme content fascinating, but the children were obviously playing up to the cameras. Their behaviour was embarrasing and the Head Teacher defended their behaviour by blaming (yep you got it the teachers). My school has just finished one year of singapore maths and the progress they have made has been brilliant, despite lots of chalk and talk and the use of text books. We had visiting teachers and our children fully embraced them and showed them respect. (Believe you me - my school is not high achieving and the behaviour requires improvemnt !) Just because a school is high achieving, like the school in the programme, doesn't mean anything if you can't teach children how to respect each other and people from other cultures.
     
  5. sebedina

    sebedina Occasional commenter

    just because a school is high achieving, like the school in the programme, doesn't mean anything if you can't teach children how to respect each other and people from other cultures.

    Well said summerdayzz. Exactly. Great to hear re Singapore maths. I find this intriguing, very interesting.
     

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