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China bans for-profit private schools in compulsory education program

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by Fer888, Nov 7, 2016.

  1. Fer888

    Fer888 Occasional commenter

    Just seen this:
    http://www.shanghaidaily.com/nation...in-compulsory-education-program/shdaily.shtml

    and was wondering how this is going to affect the private schools in China. My understanding is that previously private international schools were not allowed to recruit Chinese pupils unless they are moving back from abroad, are from Taiwan or Hong Kong, or intending to move abroad. Does anyone know if this new law is just confirming this and that those private schools with ordinary Chinese citizens are not going to be allowed to charge fees from now on?
     
  2. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    This is just a confirmation of the current rules and regulations regarding education in China as the law stands today for Chinese Nationals. The changes in policy have been outlined for the last couple of years but it seems some school organizations didn’t get the memo or it fell behind the filing cabinet.

    Nearly all the big “Rent a Name” schools have opened or are planning to open private schools for Chinese students with International teachers and most importantly a full international curriculum. All the “Rent a Names” seem to want in on the perceived cash cow of Chinese parents willing to pay 30 000 pounds a year fees for a Brand Name Education.

    The number of expat students is falling with the number of empty desks on the increases as new Brand Name international schools open. Some international school owners believed the Chinese market was ready for a quick easy milking.

    What the Chinese authorities have stated that all education from the age of 6 to 15 must follow the Chinese State Curriculum and examination schedule. This requires all Chinese students to be able to answer all state examination papers in Chinese with knowledge of Chinese History, Geography and Politics. There are outline schemes of work that require 50 hours each per year in these subjects delivered by Chinese national teachers. This situation will be familiar to anybody who has taught in the Middle East where similar schemes of work exist for Middle East History, Culture and Geography.

    What waits to be seem is if the “Rent a Name” must be removed from the from sign outside the school entrance and turned into something like “No 13 Shanghai Private School” and will the school fees be fixed at Government levels.

    Currently Chinese Private schools have their fees capped by the Chinese Government to around 10 000 UK pounds, this could be the explanation for the term “None Profit Making”. A lot of headless chickens running about now in their ivory towers.

    Maybe this in no coincidence a great many British Public Schools where in Shanghai this week looking for customers.

    No type of private school has been band here in Shanghai, you just need to follow the rules as is the same for any country.
     
  3. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    This is just a confirmation of the current rules and regulations regarding education in China as the law stands today for Chinese Nationals. The changes in policy have been outlined for the last couple of years but it seems some school organizations didn’t get the memo or it fell behind the filing cabinet.

    Nearly all the big “Rent a Name” schools have opened or are planning to open private schools for Chinese students with International teachers and most importantly a full international curriculum. All the “Rent a Names” seem to want in on the perceived cash cow of Chinese parents willing to pay 30 000 pounds a year fees for a Brand Name Education.

    The number of expat students is falling with the number of empty desks on the increases as new Brand Name international schools open. Some international school owners believed the Chinese market was ready for a quick easy milking.

    What the Chinese authorities have stated that all education from the age of 6 to 15 must follow the Chinese State Curriculum and examination schedule. This requires all Chinese students to be able to answer all state examination papers in Chinese with knowledge of Chinese History, Geography and Politics. There are outline schemes of work that require 50 hours each per year in these subjects delivered by Chinese national teachers. This situation will be familiar to anybody who has taught in the Middle East where similar schemes of work exist for Middle East History, Culture and Geography.

    What waits to be seem is if the “Rent a Name” must be removed from the from sign outside the school entrance and turned into something like “No 13 Shanghai Private School” and will the school fees be fixed at Government levels.

    Currently Chinese Private schools have their fees capped by the Chinese Government to around 10 000 UK pounds, this could be the explanation for the term “None Profit Making”. A lot of headless chickens running about now in their ivory towers.

    Maybe this in no coincidence a great many British Public Schools where in Shanghai this week looking for customers.

    No type of private school has been band here in Shanghai, you just need to follow the rules as is the same for any country.
     
  4. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

  5. Fer888

    Fer888 Occasional commenter

  6. mikemcdonald25

    mikemcdonald25 Occasional commenter

    Feb31st has it right on the legal side, however, there are ways round the law that the entrepreneurial Chinese have found. Don't forget that the franchises are just that, the schools themseles are owned by Chinese companies or individuals. So the first step in breaking the rules is outright bribery of officials. Then there is the residency in another country route; simply buying a house in NZ will get you a passport, others do actually go and live abroad for a year or two befoe they get their passport. Then there is the forged passport route apparrently they can be purchased on the streets of certain major cities. All of these will allow mainland chinese students to attend an 'international school'

    There are two other legal routes but they only apply outside of the Chinese national Curriculum that feb31st mentions; i.e international kindergatrtens up to age 6 and the post 16 add on schools that offer three year courses in IGCSE then A levels or AP (these are mostly for students trying to avoid the pressures of the gao kao.

    To paraphrase Voltaire - "All things are possible in the best of all possible worlds"
     
    ejclibrarian likes this.
  7. hsavager

    hsavager New commenter

    Dear
    Dear February31st,

    Why so much scorn for the "Rent-a-Name" schools?

    Just curious.
     
  8. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    Try working for one of them!
     
  9. mikemcdonald25

    mikemcdonald25 Occasional commenter

    hsavager

    'I refer my honourable friend to the answer I gave a moment ago'

    'Don't forget that the franchises are just that, the schools themselves are owned by Chinese companies or individuals'.


    Most/many of the franchises are as I said previously are owned by companies (often property developers) or individuals who are simply using the franchisers name and reputation to sell the school to the local population. In most cases again, the franchiser has little control, influence or management of the day to day running of the school.

    Of course the franchiser does not want their good name and reputation to be tarnished by some 'cowboy' outfit and this has, in the past, led to schools closing and/or the franchiser pulling out of a school and a subsequent name change. This has happened with the -on-the-hill school and the dull witch school on a couple of ocassions.
     
  10. Aaaarghghgh

    Aaaarghghgh New commenter

    The school on the hill lost its franchise / changed its name?!

    News to me.
     
  11. max5775

    max5775 New commenter

    Yes indeed, the non shiney one removed its name from a school in Phuket in about 2005, some would say it has never recovered. I must say that I am not acquainted with a time when the Hilly one has removed its name though....do tell.
     

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