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chilling students' food

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by kp nut, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. I am having problems getting three classes of students' food chilled. Up to 60 boxes of food like curry, bolognese etc.
    I had a complaint from a parent today and it has brought the issue to the fore. I know all the theory about getting the food chilled, after all I have a food hygeiene certificate and preach it to the students often enough and only last week we did a yr 9 lesson all about cook-chill and food safety, but I just can't get the boxes cold enough to put them in the fridge without warming the fridge up. It got up to 20°C today even after trying to get the stuiff cool first. I have one tall firdge and there is no chance of them all fitting in there anyway.
    I have tried sitting the boxes in a sinks of cold water, but can only do it for a few minutes befopre the next class arrives. Bigger boxes cool down more quickly, but take up more room in the fridge, so catch 22.
    The timetable dictates that I have these three classes on Monday morning all cooking. Cutting down on cooking is NOT an option I am prepared to take, neither is just baking instead of doing main meals. I am intent on getting them ready to fend for themselves in the future and handling meat etc is all part of that process.
    What do other schools do? I wonder about getting a blast chiller, but looking on the internet, it'd cost the school anywhere about £6000 and more for one with a 60kg capacity. I could fit another tall fridge in the room, but it doesn't solve the problem of getting the stuff cooled enough to go in the fridge in the first place.
    Any ideas please, or just knowledge of what you do, would be gratefully received, so I can discuss it with the management.




     
  2. I am having problems getting three classes of students' food chilled. Up to 60 boxes of food like curry, bolognese etc.
    I had a complaint from a parent today and it has brought the issue to the fore. I know all the theory about getting the food chilled, after all I have a food hygeiene certificate and preach it to the students often enough and only last week we did a yr 9 lesson all about cook-chill and food safety, but I just can't get the boxes cold enough to put them in the fridge without warming the fridge up. It got up to 20°C today even after trying to get the stuiff cool first. I have one tall firdge and there is no chance of them all fitting in there anyway.
    I have tried sitting the boxes in a sinks of cold water, but can only do it for a few minutes befopre the next class arrives. Bigger boxes cool down more quickly, but take up more room in the fridge, so catch 22.
    The timetable dictates that I have these three classes on Monday morning all cooking. Cutting down on cooking is NOT an option I am prepared to take, neither is just baking instead of doing main meals. I am intent on getting them ready to fend for themselves in the future and handling meat etc is all part of that process.
    What do other schools do? I wonder about getting a blast chiller, but looking on the internet, it'd cost the school anywhere about £6000 and more for one with a 60kg capacity. I could fit another tall fridge in the room, but it doesn't solve the problem of getting the stuff cooled enough to go in the fridge in the first place.
    Any ideas please, or just knowledge of what you do, would be gratefully received, so I can discuss it with the management.




     
  3. janharper

    janharper Occasional commenter

    I used to sell foil dishes with lids. Pupils wrote their names on the cardboard lid, and placed the foil dishes on a table near the fridge. All pupils knew the 2 hour rule and the next class helped me stack them in the fridge. I could almost fit one class's products on one shelf.
    Cakes and other low risk foods were stacked up on a trolley in the room.
    If left to their own devices they would use large biscuit tins and chill aprons and recipe books, together with flour and sugar!
    First thing in the morning I would insist that only high risk foods went in the fridge and everything else went on the trolley.
     
  4. We have fans to cool the food down before I put the food in fridges. Also we have lots of fridges. Don't very often find it a problem but then maybe its because of the way we have planned the practicals for all the different years?
     
  5. We also looked into the cost of a chiller & agree they are too expensive, went for 3 fridges in both rooms & except it is not ideal - but would it be any better if someone was bulk cooking at home?
    Think it is more important to get the message of reheating across to them.

     
  6. Thanks so far, very useful.
    I do have an ingredient fridge which they are under 'pain of death' to only put high risk food in, labelled with name, otherwise as you commented, everything would just be dumped in there.
    I may have to go down the line of fans; where to site them would be the next issue as there would be no space in my room.

    More comments would be fantastic, so I can have a fruitful discussion with the management.
     
  7. This is a health and safety issue- you MUST ask for more fridges and they should be industrial quality- I managed to buy just one of these about 5 yrs ago (about £1700) to complement the 4 domestic ones I had and it made all the difference high risk dishes could go in after 2 hrs and the larger size meant enough room. It broke down once and we used the canteen cold store- is this an option for you?
     

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