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Childrens photos in Learning Journey

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by kaz_allan, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. Hi
    can anyone confirm whether or not we are supposed to black out faces of other children in individual learning journeys? Our feeder nursery say that this is a legal requirement - but we have never been told this by anyone else?
    thanks
     
  2. Hi
    can anyone confirm whether or not we are supposed to black out faces of other children in individual learning journeys? Our feeder nursery say that this is a legal requirement - but we have never been told this by anyone else?
    thanks
     
  3. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Ask for written confirmation of that.
    Personally, if, as a parent, I was handed a 'learning journey' with all the faces bar that of my own child blacked out, it would give me serious creeps.
     
  4. the learning journeys from our feeder nursery do look a bit wierd with blacked out parts but they say its a legal requirement - child protection issues!!

    I will ask to see where this directive came from, just wondered if anyone had heard of this or did this in reception currently.

    thanks
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    If it were true - and I'm sure it isn't - you'd have to weep for the future of the human race.
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    No it isn't a legal requirement but if you use photographs you should ensure parents have given consent and are aware that their child's image may appear in general photographs and that they can only share pictures with family (not on the internet etc). You should know if their are any children who may be at risk if they appear in photographs ... we had a Looked after child who couldn't be photographed due to court restrictions
    Check if the school has a consent form
     
  7. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Msz's post was [as usual [​IMG]] much more measured and useful than mine.
    Our school has the same procedures, and parents are all aware of them.
     
  8. Thanks all - we send out a standard form for parents to consent to general use of photos for their child so I guess this will be fine for the learning journeys for all those that have agreed.

     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Well who wants photographs with all their friends blacked out?
    I wonder what the feeder nursery suggests for class /school /team/group photographs taken by an official photographer
     
  10. Here's what I think - photos should not be taken routinely if faces of children have to be blacked out.
    What is the world coming to?
    On the one hand, I've seen advisory local authority documents that really are stating photos must be taken at every twist and turn to record 'process' and to provide evidence, presumably, about - what?

    On the other hand, there is a big deal about photos and children and privacy considerations.
    It's all like a contradiction in terms.
    The only great thing about photos (justification for them), in my opinion, is to get some occasional mementos for parents who aren't able to see some of the lovely time that their children have in their daily lives.
     
  11. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    The 'Clipboard culture' is now being ridiculed by the very people who praised it to the skies a few years ago. Hopefully, the same scorn will now be heaped upon the need for mountains of expensive ink being expended on any but truly significant snapshots.
     
  12. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    I argued this til I was blue (or probably more purple) in the face with our LA moderators last summer. They REFUSED to take into account any photos or video held on PCs as "evidence" towards our assessments. Still taking no notice of them though. 99% of my photos are on PC.
     
  13. I only print out the significant ones - one or two per term that coincide with a long obs that covers several objectives and sometimes several children.
    The others are kept on my PC and made into a slideshow for parents to view whilst waiting to see me on parent's evenings or at assemblies and stay and play sessions. If Ofsted wanted me to, I could happily talk through what the children were doing on every single one of them. After all, written evidence is only typed or written words that would have to come out of my head anyway - why does everyone think it is more valuable if it is written down? Waste of time!
     
  14. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    I couldn't agree more!
     

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