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Children with speech and language difficulties: strategies and issues

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by justme1982, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. Hello there, I am conducting some research into issues facing mainstream teachers with regards to ensuring access to the curriculum for students with speech and language difficulties. I would appreciate as many responses as possible so I have more information to analyse.

    1) how many students do you teach with identified speech and language difficulties?
    2) what problems do these students encounter in the mainstream classroom?
    3) what strategies do you use to ensure access to the curriculum for these students?
    4) would additional support or training be beneficial to give you further classroom strategies and what specific training needs would you require?
    5) what issues can prevent access to the curriculum for these students?
    6) any further comments?

    Thank you for your time.
     
  2. Hello there, I am conducting some research into issues facing mainstream teachers with regards to ensuring access to the curriculum for students with speech and language difficulties. I would appreciate as many responses as possible so I have more information to analyse.

    1) how many students do you teach with identified speech and language difficulties?
    2) what problems do these students encounter in the mainstream classroom?
    3) what strategies do you use to ensure access to the curriculum for these students?
    4) would additional support or training be beneficial to give you further classroom strategies and what specific training needs would you require?
    5) what issues can prevent access to the curriculum for these students?
    6) any further comments?

    Thank you for your time.
     
  3. HI,
    I work in a secondary school with 1200 boys.Here are my answers.
    1). Personally only 2, (caused by Dyspraxia and MD) although there are in the region of 50 -60 in the school including a selective mute.
    2). Making themselves understood to the teacher when answering questions, inability to pronounce some words correctly and lack of confidence when peers laugh at their attempts.
    3). Most of these boys are supported at least some of the time by support staff who may 'translate' for the teacher or quietly prompt the child with the correct word.
    4). Any educated person should be able to think on their feet to get over problems. Training can help but with so many causes it would take years to study them all.
    5). If there is a hearing or cognitive impairment then the child won't be able to understand instructions
    6). Keep trying. There is no 'cure-all' to fit all children, we just have to do the best we can and keep sharing information.
    Good luck with your research,

    Lesley
     
  4. Dodros

    Dodros Established commenter

    1) how many students do you teach with identified speech and language
    difficulties?
    I'm retired now, but I recall 2 with speech problems with whom I worked particularly closely. My mainstream secondary school now has a number of students with diagnosed autistic spectrum disorders, each of them with degrees of language-based communication and interaction difficulty.
    2) what problems do these students encounter in the mainstream
    classroom?
    Communication problems due to speech impairments (medial "l" in one case). The students with ASD have well documented problems with figurative and expressive language.

    3) what strategies do you use to ensure access to the curriculum for
    these students?

    Avoidance of reading aloud in class. Use of classroom support assistants to interpret. In the case of students with ASD, care taken to avoid unnecessary use of metaphor.
    4) would additional support or training be beneficial to give you
    further classroom strategies and what specific training needs would you
    require?
    Support and strategies are best related to specific students, through their educational history, and to specific subjects, which may help with, or exacerbate speech and language issues. I would like to see more subject-specific guides to SLCN rather than just general guidance to this kind of SEN. There is a series of subject-specific guides to ASD at
    http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/wholeschool/sen/teacherlearningassistant/ASDKS34/
    Why not something similar for SLCN?
    5) what issues can prevent access to the curriculum for these students?
    Low self-esteem. Inability to contribute in subjects, e.g. English and MFL, where the spoken word carries weight. Difficulty with group work if other members of the group aren't prepared to make an effort to listen to what the student with SLCN has to say.
    6) any further comments?
    I've made resources for a girl with SLCN who had problems with medial [l] because the speech therapist could only provide me with Americanised materials:
    http://www.specialeducationalneeds.com/sen/medial_l.pdf
    I created a classroom guide to SLCN for teachers and posted it on my website at
    http://www.specialeducationalneeds.com/sen/inclusion_slcn.pdf
    As a former MFL teacher, I have a bibliography of MFL and SEN at
    http://www.specialeducationalneeds.com/mfl/biblio.doc
    containing 1777 references, over 40 of which are in the SLCN section.

    and a teacher-training case study of a MFL learner with SLCN at
    http://www.specialeducationalneeds.com/case/slcn.html
    Good luck with your research.
     
  5. Dear Lesley,

    Thank you for your opinions. They will certainly help my research. However I think with regards to training needs for staff, many teachers may not have enough knowledge of Speech and Language and would probably welcome further support/advice from an SEN dept or through extra training. This is what I am trying to establish anyway.
    Thanks again
     
  6. acthell

    acthell New commenter

    1) how many students do you teach with identified speech and language difficulties?
    Many more than are identified (about 30). Many are just given a MLD label or incorrectly identified with dyslexia or reluctant learner labels

    2) what problems do these students encounter in the mainstream classroom?
    They try to listen but don't understand or take too long to process the instructions - get into trouble, stop listening, stop responding positively. Or attempt the task... don't get it but don't acknowledge to staff and then write the answer and get it very wrong....

    3) what strategies do you use to ensure access to the curriculum for these students?
    Visuals. Structure. Rewards.

    4) would additional support or training be beneficial to give you further classroom strategies and what specific training needs would you require?
    Cued articulation.

    5) what issues can prevent access to the curriculum for these students?
    Staff pitching things way too high. Lack of understanding of needs.

    6) any further comments?
     

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