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Children from social housing not allowed on playground

Discussion in 'Personal' started by bobpite, Mar 26, 2019.

  1. bobpite

    bobpite New commenter

    This is an extraordinary story and makes me wonder how bad things can get. A development consisting of private homes and social housing is run by a private company.HENLEY HOMES in the Borough of Lambeth. It seems that children who come from the social housing are excluded from the play areas that the children from the private homes are provided with. I'm sure everyone will find this a repellent act but more believable day by day. Pity any poor teachers that have to explain to the excluded kids why they can not share the playspace.
    https://www.theguardian.com/cities/...-disgusting-segregated-playground-sparks-fury

    ps don't forget to sign the Government petition to revoke Article 50.
     
    TCSC47 likes this.
  2. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Why would teachers have to explain the playspace issue to the children who live in the development?
     
    Dinay, Oscillatingass, xmal and 7 others like this.
  3. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    Isn't it a case of you get what you pay for? Sure it seems harsh but at the end of the day`,the social housing occupants are not paying the expensive maintenance fees to keep the place nice...including the play areas.If they wish to contribute to the maintenance then maybe their children will be welcome. The building company might have been more tactful and put either grass in the social area or mulch in the private area so the distinction was not so obvious.
    However, it is a fact of life that if you want nice things then you must work for them(or your parents should)
    What next...all parents to be given brand new cars because its unfair for poor children to be driven round in old bangers or take public transport.
     
  4. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    Off topic for a second but I think the whole development is pretty awful It still looks like a school. I would never feel that I had left work if I lived there.
     
  5. sbkrobson

    sbkrobson Star commenter

    I wish the papers would stop running stories of disgusting levels of unfairness or disrespect or inequality between everyday groups of people, when the real crime here is the disgusting level of unfairness at the top which forces perfectly decent people into social housing in the first place.
     
    BTBAM, oldsomeman and MAGAorMIGA like this.
  6. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    To some extent I agree with you about the papers. However I wish the papers would stop publishing stories that appear to support other people's perceived injustice. When people start wanting what others have and the msm champions their right to have have it (or at least questions why they dont have it) whatever the circumstances, and furthermore uses children as the focus to support their view then,in my opinion we are heading towards dangerous territory. Life has always been unfair and there have always been the have's and have nots. Why are people running to the papers when they cant get what they want? What is the motive of the paper for publishing their story?
     
  7. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    If all those people live in the same development/estate,it is hard to understand why a playground would just be reserved for only some of the residents.
     
    corgie11 likes this.
  8. smoothnewt

    smoothnewt Star commenter

    Social housing has always been necessary and always will be. I'd argue that there needs to be far more of it.
    What stinks in this case is the fact that the developers apparently deliberately adjusted the plans after they had been given the go-ahead. To quote from yesterday's article in the Guardian:

    "To gain planning permission for the development, the plans had to include “affordable” homes and social rental units. But a Guardian investigation found the designs were altered after planning permission was granted to block the social housing tenants from accessing the communal play areas."

    It's pretty low on the part of the developers to have behaved in this way, and to have planted a hedge where originally there was a gate on the plans to give access to the social housing tenants.
     
    corgie11, chelsea2 and nizebaby like this.
  9. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    Because the private residents are paying through the nose for maintenance, which includes the garden and play areas.
    Therefore they should have a say in who uses it. At least there is a playground provided for the social tenants. Its not like they haven't got anything.A lot of fuss over nothing but plain and simple envy...willingly stirred up by the papers.
     
  10. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    What's new? When I bought my first property (a new build) it became pretty obvious in the first year that we were lied to and plans had been changed. Wish it could be different but it could have been worse. As in this case.
    Actually in practical terms the grass areas are going to end up looking much worse than the mulch areas in the long run.
     
  11. smoothnewt

    smoothnewt Star commenter

    Two wrongs don't make a right. Fortunately in this case pressure is being applied on the developers:

    "The council argued it no longer had any control over access to the playground spaces. In February, after being contacted by the Guardian for this story, Lambeth council wrote to Henley Homes.

    The letter, from councillor Joanne Simpson, said: “Developing a sense of community was a key argument made at planning stage … so I am deeply concerned to hear … that social exclusion of children is being deliberated engineered, on account of their housing tenure. However, this is a civil matter regarding the management agency and it is only within your gift to ensure that all play spaces are available for all children to use.”

    Leading housing lawyers say there could be a basis for challenging the situation. Martin George, the associate professor of property law at the University of Leicester, said he has been discussing with legal colleagues the potential for action against some of the parties involved. His callout on social media asks for people with legal expertise to join him in helping the residents challenge the segregation."

    It will be interesting to see if the developers eventually backtrack.
     
  12. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    Well lets hope that the private residents have a say in this too. If the council no longer have any control over the area this means that maintenance/upkeep is the responsibility of the private residents.

    I'm sure that the matter will be resolved in favour of the social tenants...it usually is.The problem really is in the original planning and both social and private have been lied to in this case.

    Why anyone would want to but/rent a property with a kids playground smack in the middle is beyond me but I feel sorry for all involved.
     
  13. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    In a way, it's not new, Go into areas like Sloane Square in London and see the gated parks only for the use of certain residents. On one hand, you can see their point to exclude others if they are paying in their lease for such a facitity. Yet excluding some groups, might keep the place safer for them to use..especially when one sees the state of open spaces used by the whole community. The danger is always that the few 'baddies' give everyone else a poor reputation
     
  14. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    Er, people with children obviously.
     
    Jamvic and towncryer like this.
  15. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    Offensive to suggest that the social tenants aren't working, or aren't working hard enough. Have you tried living in London whilst only getting the minimum wage for a job? Sometimes people have two jobs and still aren't able to make ends meet.

    No, there isn't. There is a little narrow strip of land down the side of one block for social tenants' toddlers - under 5's - to use.
     
    Jamvic, corgie11, smoothnewt and 3 others like this.
  16. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    Fair comment.
     
    Jamvic and InkyP like this.
  17. Lalad

    Lalad Star commenter

    Who is going to police the children to make sure only the 'right' kind of child is allowed in? What happens when the 'right' kind of child has friends who live in the 'wrong' kind of house? The whole situation is fraught with difficulty.
     
    FrankWolley likes this.
  18. LondonCanary

    LondonCanary Established commenter

    It's all in the wording
    It isn't children who have no acccess. It's all social housing residents.
    This is the alleged "posh" play area which looks qute like a garden.
    [​IMG]

    The is the poor play area, which looks quite like a play area.
    [​IMG]
     
    agathamorse and towncryer like this.
  19. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    And I am sure that there are places in London...social and private where there is nothing at all...not even a narrow strip of land.
     
  20. towncryer

    towncryer Established commenter

    I'm not suggesting that they aren't working. I am saying that if you want nice things you need to work for them...there is a difference. There are quite a few things I would like in life that I can't afford but probably could do if I did a little self- improvement and got a better paid job but I accept that my life style suits me and do without. Back in the 80's I also struggled to make ends meet...3 jobs at one time...and I would have loved my life and circumstances to have been better than they were but I never felt that I had the right to it.I never went to the papers to complain about the unfairness of it all.

    They are lucky that they have a property in a central part of London..probably without having had to jump through the hoops that the private residents have had to get theirs...nor the massive financial commitment. Now they are looking over the fence and wanting more for nothing and the papers are egging them on.
     
    agathamorse likes this.

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