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Children copying each others work.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by lillipad, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    I seem to have a group of children who relentlessly copy other children's work. I'm in a small classroom where there is not much space for children to be seated away from eachother. I always say how important it is not to copy and to think for yourself but there seems to me to be a group who think they don't have to listen while on the carpet & then can just look at the person next to them for the answers... As a result, when they're suddenly alone, they can't do a thing! How can I minimise this? I know moving them on their own would be an answer but it's not really easy in my room... so would like some other suggestions?!
     
  2. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    I seem to have a group of children who relentlessly copy other children's work. I'm in a small classroom where there is not much space for children to be seated away from eachother. I always say how important it is not to copy and to think for yourself but there seems to me to be a group who think they don't have to listen while on the carpet & then can just look at the person next to them for the answers... As a result, when they're suddenly alone, they can't do a thing! How can I minimise this? I know moving them on their own would be an answer but it's not really easy in my room... so would like some other suggestions?!
     
  3. Sit all the kids who copy next to each other :)
     
  4. upsadaisy

    upsadaisy New commenter

    Train the other child to shield their work? Make the copier wear horse blinds?
     
  5. greta444

    greta444 New commenter

    I would sit them together and clueless until they learn to listen to the introduction.
     
  6. Give them different questions? Or the same questions in a different order - eg in maths use dice to generate the questions.
    Gradually, over weeks and years, teach them that they are at school to learn, not 'to get the right answers' . Easier said than done, but not impossible.
     
  7. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    I agree, this is what we need to do, but needs masses of reinforcement.
     
  8. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I don't often give tasks that would allow children to just copy each other. Maybe try a few open ended or create your own tasks that mean they 'can't' copy just to get them out of the habit.

    But also sometimes accept that copying is a good thing. Children can sometimes learn by copying.
     
  9. Make sure that you tell them how bo-ring it is for you mark the same work, and make a bit of a scene about it, following it up by telling them that you want their original answers, not necessarily the right answer. Oh and keep pulling them up on it with 'See me' in their book without marking the work - that usually nips it in the bud as they get tired of having to hear the same spiel haha
     
  10. Totally agree! Depends on the task and subject, for example if it's a numeracy question and they just write the answer then yes, you need to find a way to engage these chn in working it out themselves, but for things like literacy I think chn often work together rather than copy, and can extend their ideas/vocab/sentence structures etc by sharing ideas in this way.
    Assuming you are pitching these whole-class questions somewhere in the mid-level range for the class, there will always be chn for whom the right answer is just not achievable, so it boosts their confidence to copy and feel part of the session, rather than publicly reminded they are not as bright as the others. You either need to work mega-hard on creating a classroom culture where it is genuinely OK to be wrong, without taunts or embarrassment (not just there and then, but at playtime etc), or allow these chn to play along in their own way and address their understanding seperately as part of differentiation.
    Unless of course are just clever, lazy gets, in which case heap praise on them for getting it right and ask them to explain to the class how they got their answer...they may just start thinking for themselves!
     
  11. Try Chris Biffle's approach at www.wholebrainteaching.com. He has ways and means of giving you help in a class with"copiers". He suggests that a small degree of copying scaffolds learning as well. His strategies may assist you. At the end of the day the chn. identify copying as a way to accelerate their own learning. Maybe if they saw something else as more attractive than copying, it may sway their thinking to be responsible for their own learning.
     
  12. Just realised I misread your post slightly, I thought they were copying when on the carpet (on mini-whiteboards etc) but it's when they're back on tables...others seem to have given some good ideas. Good luck!
     

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