1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Child very late in development

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by im_bored, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. Increasing I feel like I am failing a child in my class...

    As the rest of the children develop he falls further and further behind. With most of the children in my class (primary 3/2) being able to complete a sentence and guess the spelling of most words I have a boy who still cannot complete simple tasks such as spelling, writing or recognising his own name.
    After teaching a lesson he requires one to one support to complete any follow up task as he has very little concentration and needs constant reassurance or help with reading or writing.

    With support in the class slowly disappearing due to council cut backs I find myself very stretched and more and more he is left on his own to cope as I need to give other groups help and advice.

    The more time he spends in the class the less children are patient with him and some find it very difficult to work with him as they feel like they are doing double the work. He also finds play difficult as he flees from one activity to the next with complaints from the children because he has stood on a game or knocked over blocks.

    I am lost as to what to do. It is difficult enough juggling 5 groups within the class because it is a composite but every day I am looking out more and more separate work for him to suit his ability (which the primary 1's next door have completed in term 2!)

    help!
     
  2. Increasing I feel like I am failing a child in my class...

    As the rest of the children develop he falls further and further behind. With most of the children in my class (primary 3/2) being able to complete a sentence and guess the spelling of most words I have a boy who still cannot complete simple tasks such as spelling, writing or recognising his own name.
    After teaching a lesson he requires one to one support to complete any follow up task as he has very little concentration and needs constant reassurance or help with reading or writing.

    With support in the class slowly disappearing due to council cut backs I find myself very stretched and more and more he is left on his own to cope as I need to give other groups help and advice.

    The more time he spends in the class the less children are patient with him and some find it very difficult to work with him as they feel like they are doing double the work. He also finds play difficult as he flees from one activity to the next with complaints from the children because he has stood on a game or knocked over blocks.

    I am lost as to what to do. It is difficult enough juggling 5 groups within the class because it is a composite but every day I am looking out more and more separate work for him to suit his ability (which the primary 1's next door have completed in term 2!)

    help!
     
  3. You need to get some support for him. Have you referred him to your SENCO? Does he have an IEP - at what level? Has he been seen by an ed psych?
     
  4. Lots of people have came to observe but they seem to all reply with the same statement EdPsychologist said "He has a lot of difficulties and he needs seen by behaviour management and CALMS before he can get involved" So then CALMS came in and said "yeah he does need support, but before we can help him he needs to be evaluated by behaviour support" then behaviour support came to see him and said it was a develop issue and not a behaviour issue. Within a year.. we have got no where. I feel like most outside agencies arent communicating and seem to think that other issues need to be dealt with before they can come in.

    Yes, he does have behaviour issues but he also has major developmental issues which cause a lot of his behaviour because he does not understand how to behave in certain situations.

    SMT have recently said that (in so many words) he is in your class and is your responsibility, give him separate work if he can not complete a follow up task and try to include his as much as you can. Easier said then done :(
     
  5. marymoocow

    marymoocow Star commenter

    Is he clumsy? You may be able to suggest to the parents to get him checked out by his GP and then peadiatrician for physical development problems such as dyspraxia which may lead to other issues being picked up. Only a doctor can diagnose conditions such as ADHD, ASD etc and it is often not worth getting in other agencies until they have an official diagnosis. What was he like in Foundation stage? What developmental stage did he start school on?
     
  6. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Does this poor soul have 'global delays'?
    In my experience, globally delayed children have had zero support because it's a blanket term that covers a multitude of sins. Depressing, no? I'm thinking of a particular child with no behavioural issues at all - he's a sweet boy - whose presence at my school makes a mockery of inclusion.
     
  7. You could try getting the community paediatrician involved. The idea of encouraging the parents to take him to the GP is also worth following. Have a meeting with the parents about his school and home issues. You could write a letter for them to take to the GP outlining the school's concerns. Have you completed a CRISP assessment? This would define the problem areas in which he needs support.
     
  8. You should speak to the parents and say you have concerns with his progression - try to pin point specifics rather than give your thoughts on diagnosis. Suggest they speak to their GP for a referal to the community Multi Disciplinary Team (paed, pschy, s&l etc). They should assess the child and also request a report from the school. Hopefully that should get the ball rolling. Have the parents spotted any difficulties or concerns at home?
     
  9. Sorry Thumbie - didn't read your post properly; you just said all that.
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Can I get this clear ... he has been seen by the Ed Psych? Behavioural support? CAMHS? Paediatrician?
    Could you try a "work station" approach with work at his level and the clear expectation is that he
    completes his set tasks at his work station?
    I would also ask the SENCO for a CAF and a multi agency meeting of all agencies involved so far to plan the way forward
     
  11. I know its really har, especially if your not getting the support he needs. Make sure you break down his learning into very small steps and celebrate each tiny success. Try not to compare him to the rest of the class. You are then doing all you can for him bar fighting for more help
     
  12. he is clumsy.. and regularly gets visits from the school nurse as his weight and height arent what they are supposed to be (he is so fragile looking!). I do believe that he has a form of dyspraxia (although his walking has really improved since he came to the school, he falls over himself a lot less). His mum tries her best with him, but I regularly get the impression that he is a handful at home and what i see in the classroom is him trying his best to follow what he is told.
    I like the idea of celebrating small successes and organising his work so that he knows exactly what he should complete in the one day. This is something I regularly do- since beginning primary two he has been working on his phonics, we have been trying lots of different and exciting ways to look at phonics and hoping that constant repetition will bring on some solid learning. However, he is still really struggling. He finds work frustrating, boring and no matter how fun you try to make his learning he still requires one to one support to keep him focused and motivated. But this brings me back to my original point, with support slowly disappearing... he is getting left out and left behind.
    My next step is going to be for a sit down with all the outside agencies because I just cant bare to see him sitting there struggling and he is only going to get further behind as the year goes on and then he'll be in primary three!
     
  13. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    We've all been there. It's all part of Inclusion.
    Sorry. I could weep for the children who've been ill-served in the name of so-called Inclusion.
     
  14. Had a meeting with my HT today. After completing some tests with him, the results show that he is about a year and a half behind in his development. Been asked to give him his own plan of work which will be separate to the class, a Pupil support assistant will be allocated when they can. Not too sure where the inclusion is, but what can you do.
     
  15. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    The old global delay chestnut seems to be failing children in bucketloads. We had a boy in our school who was diagnosed with global dealy and got further and further and further behind and eventually in Y5 was accepted in a special school. We have another in Y2 who is heading the same way. Can't read CVC words, can't count to 10 and this is after interventions and IEPs ever since he came into reception. No extra support allocated because he has no behaviour issues. I have a child in my class who is functioning at the level of a 2.5 year old - no extra support allocated because there are no behaviour issues. I feel really sad for these children.
     
  16. Whilst there are some excellent suggestions here, the one thing that will really accelerate any action is to get the parents involved. From what you say you get the impression he is a handful at home but what does the parents say? are they fully aware of his progress at school and the visits from the outside agencies? The parents are the ones who can get that support by going to the GP, by applying for a sen from the council themselves and indeed making sure the school does practice 'inclusion' but as children are always an emotive subject you are going to have to get the parents on board - easier said than done.
     
  17. Well, thats the thing.. the boy in question has been referred to the Child protection office because we are worried about things at home. His mum always has the right answers, she practices his numbers/phonics and he "writes all the time" at home. However, when asking the boy.. he has another story to tell. He "goes out to play" a lot eats dinner and likes to watch his Balamory Videos in his room whilst his mum spending "adult time" with her boyfriend. When a ASN school was mentioned last year she was very against it and said she doesnt want him to go there and would rather we keep him with his "friends". The GP himself was the one who referred him for further tests because of his height and weight.. not the mother.
     
  18. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    In the meantime, can he drop into the year below where he won't be so far behind everyone else, easier to plan for as he won't be quite the special case in everything that he is in your class? He might get a fresh start at making friends too.
    I presume you are in Scotland from the numbering system you use - I thought there was more flexibility there on age within classes.
     
  19. sadly that isnt an option because the primary one classroom has such needy children as well. Luckily I have the new educational Psychologist coming out to observe him again.
    The girl has just qualified so hopefully she'll bring us some fresh new ideas.
     
  20. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Dropping children a year does more harm than good in general (IMHO)
    I had a child last year who was working at the level of a 4 year old (3 years behind) and used a work station with individualised work for her quite successfully.
     

Share This Page