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Child not hearing initial phoneme in oral blending and segment - advice please.

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by oliverferret, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    I have a child in my class who at the end of last term only knew 12 sounds and could not orally blend or segment at all. He has been having 10 mins 1:1 every day since the beginning of term and when assessed today still only knew 12 sounds (some different from previous) and is now hearing the final phoneme in words and sometimes the median phoneme, but never the initial. So for c-u-p he will say "up", for "top" "o-p".

    I'd be grateful for some ideas for activities/strategies to support him.

    Thanks
     
  2. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    I have a child in my class who at the end of last term only knew 12 sounds and could not orally blend or segment at all. He has been having 10 mins 1:1 every day since the beginning of term and when assessed today still only knew 12 sounds (some different from previous) and is now hearing the final phoneme in words and sometimes the median phoneme, but never the initial. So for c-u-p he will say "up", for "top" "o-p".

    I'd be grateful for some ideas for activities/strategies to support him.

    Thanks
     
  3. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Is it what he is saying that is "wrong" or what he is"hearing".
    What are the parents like? Are you able to show them exactly what you are doing and why and see if they can unravel the mystery at home?
    Could be a hearing problem?
    How old is this child?

     
  4. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    He is 5 years old. i am presuming that he is not hearing the initial sound but I could be wrong and also that it is some sort of processing issue rather than hearing loss. He does not articulate all his sounds correctly when speaking, but not sufficiently poor to qualify for speech therapy.

    His home life is quite chaotic for a variety of reasons - practically he rarely brings his book bag to school. Mum has told me that she was slow to learn to read,
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I'd still have his hearing assessed.
     
  6. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Yes, and in the meantime make no assumptions about ability, what he could learn etc. This is only anecdotal, and may not fit your situation at all. I have helped out at a school where a boy was not given much opportunity to progress as they seemed to be waiting for him to be able to pronounce everything perfectly before they were willing to put him on any kind of satisfactory programme for learning to read.
    If you listened to him carefully you could tell that he could read phase 1 and phase 2 high frequency words (after playing some games with him one to one with these words for a few weeks), and he could recognise and read a fair number of sounds. He was consistent in his mispronunciations. If you made him look at you while you were making the individual sounds or reading simple words, things improved greatly, you could explain a bit more about using tongue, teeth etc. He needed a fairly active approach too punctuated by going out round the playground to find things beginning with a certain sound etc etc, doing alphabet jigsaws etc. All impossible in the classroom setting.
    The more you worked with him one to one the more you could understand of what he was saying and realise there was more to him than met the eye.
    One to one I am sure he could have progressed with easy decodable books like the green and purple read write inc books as in a daring moment I tried him on this rather than doing what I had been told to do with him (carry on bashing through sounds and trying to get the poor lad to pronounce them perfectly). Two years on and I still don't think he can read properly, and I'm not sure how much his actual speech has improved.
    Is there a volunteer who can work with him every day and do games, reading etc etc. Maybe an intelligent retired parent who you can leave to their own devices a bit and see if they make some headway with him? I know it's unscientific, but in the meantime while you are gathering external support maybe it might give you some headroom, give him a kickstart, and give him the quality adult attention and listening time he is maybe not getting at home.
     
  7. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Don't forget initial sound I-Spy!
     
  8. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Use lots of clues - hold up hand and shake it while saying 'I spy..etc...something beginning with hhh' Children catch on to this pretty quickly as a rule.

    Though there's always the exception...
     
  9. Does he have to do the blending 'orally'? Why couldn't he have letters as 'prompts' for the sounds? Then he won't have to remember the order they should be in, he'll be able to see it.
     

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