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Child ( in your class or school) related crying.

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Phoenixchild, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. Phoenixchild

    Phoenixchild Occasional commenter

    One of the children in my class broke his arm yesterday....I don't KNOW this as fact because it happened about 3 0'clock but in terms of knowing I know, if you know what I mean..
    I saw him do it, saw his face crumple (tough little lad normally) had to get me, him and the rest of kids off the playground. No TA Only me in my area of the school.
    With hindsight I'm proud of the way I handled myself and reassured him just had a big cry last night when it was all done and dusted, hub doesn't understand why I'm crying over the broken arm of a child in my class......couldn't explain, how can you to someone who doesn't understand that?
    Anyway, my question after the waffle. Does the pain physical or otherwise, of the children you teach transfer itself to you? Do you want to take their pain away and feel pain that you can't or am I just a soppy mare? *I know I am, just hoping I'm not the only one!*xx
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Phoenixchild

    Phoenixchild Occasional commenter

    One of the children in my class broke his arm yesterday....I don't KNOW this as fact because it happened about 3 0'clock but in terms of knowing I know, if you know what I mean..
    I saw him do it, saw his face crumple (tough little lad normally) had to get me, him and the rest of kids off the playground. No TA Only me in my area of the school.
    With hindsight I'm proud of the way I handled myself and reassured him just had a big cry last night when it was all done and dusted, hub doesn't understand why I'm crying over the broken arm of a child in my class......couldn't explain, how can you to someone who doesn't understand that?
    Anyway, my question after the waffle. Does the pain physical or otherwise, of the children you teach transfer itself to you? Do you want to take their pain away and feel pain that you can't or am I just a soppy mare? *I know I am, just hoping I'm not the only one!*xx
    [​IMG]
     
  3. I think when you spend a lot of time with children you do care about them. I am secondary and when one of my form is having a difficult time is does affect me as I hate seeing them in pain - whether it is physical or emotional.
     
  4. I don't understand either. It's your job to teach them. And, if they injure themselves, get them to the school's designated first aider. Why cry about it?
    cyolba, hard as nails :)
     
  5. Phoenixchild

    Phoenixchild Occasional commenter

    Me too KIAT!
    Another question then for Mr cyolba, do you think this particular soppiness is down to females then?xx
     
  6. I think it's probably as much shock as sympathy for the child's pain. I once saw a complete stranger get knocked down and, while I managed to get help etc. very efficiently at the time, I had a crying fit afterwards when the adrenaline faded.
     
  7. Good question, PC. I think that men would cry more, but it isn't seen to be acceptable. So, they learn not to do so. Is this a good thing? I don't know. I do know that men tend to bottle things up more, go to the doctor less frequently etc. So perhaps crying over a kid in your class is healthy. I just don't see it as normal, neither would most men, I guess. Venus and Mars, innit?

    cyolba, crying out for a cup of tea :)
     
  8. Phoenixchild

    Phoenixchild Occasional commenter

    I agree Airy, it is partly shock.
    Lol Mr cyolba, I think that's why I love men as a species [​IMG] down to earth, matter of fact and get on with it.xx
    [​IMG]
     
  9. I agree that you are probably not particularly crying over the child nor the arm

    Sounds like it was a stressful situation for you ... sometimes the natural reaction is to cry when such a situation is over
     
  10. I work with teenagers who, among a lot of other conditions, have epilepsy. Sometimes, when their bodies are literally ravaged by one seizure after another and they have to be pumped full of IV medicine to stop them, it does make me upset and makes me wish there was something I could do to take their pain away. Another student I work with had an infection that left him in hospital and was shivering and crying without making any sound and that made me upset as well. One student recently had a seizure and then sat up and said, "Don't like it!" I think, in situations like that, they majority of people would be upset, as would most people when faced with someone who has severely injured themselves-I think it's completely natural.
     
  11. Yes, it's upsetting but children do have accidents and injure themselves. The worst I had was a boy who sliced his knee open and I mean open and I had to drive him to hospital making soothing noises. This was obviously years ago pre H and S, Risk assessments and child safety issues! The problem was it was making me feel icky - that said, we managed the situation but I didn't like having to administer an injection in the hospital as there was no nurse to assist the doctor. Those were the days...
     
  12. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    When my daughter was in Reception, her class did one of those tea towel marketing things where each child draws a teeny picture of themselves and they are all printed onto a tea towel for parents to buy.
    One girl in her class died of meningitis soon afterwards and it always brings tears to my eyes seeing this little childish drawing of herself amongst all the others who did get to grow up.
    I can't use it and have to leave it in the bottom drawer.
    Eyes leaking now, just thinking about it.
     
  13. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    Oh dear, I've gone all tight too, reading that!! Sounds like you care, OP, which is a good thing, frankly.
    I found it very difficult to cope with a child's tears for her grandma, who died on Monday, last Friday. She is the same age as my son, so I imagine her grandma is the same age as my mum, which made it worse.
    It is a terrible thing to witness someone you are about in pain - and breaking a bone is horrible. not surprised you cried. Don't beat yourself up about it. x
     
  14. dusty67

    dusty67 New commenter

    We have a child in Y6 whose mother developed breast cancer around the time she was born, but because she was feeding the baby it didn't get picked up as soon as it should have and she died.

    The elder sister was in our nursery and mum came to school in her p-j's straight from the hospital bed to ask us to look after her babies. I'm crying now thinking of it. the children have always been dear to us. Each Friday before mothers day as everyone else makes their card, we take a quiet moment with her to talk about her mum.

    It was bad enough when the eldest left us, dad and all the staff shared a tear. They'll not be a dry eye in the hall at this one's leaving assembly.
     
  15. I am quite unsentimental a lot of the time, but I was really shaken by a child who disclosed to me. Mr Side understood, but only one person at school asked if I was alright.
     

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