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cheese vs milk

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by sparklyrainbowfish, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. Hi
    First, my apologies as this isn't a cooking question - but it is a food one. I'm hoping someone on here will be able to answer my question!
    I have a problem with milk and cream in that they both upset my stomach a bit (and ice-cream too). I don't think I'm intolerant as such, as I can take very small quantities (I tend to avoid instead as it's much easier).
    But I can eat cheese and things that have cooked milk in them without consequence.
    One example is cheesecake. I love cheesecake, but now can only eat the New-York style baked variety. I made the mistake a couple of months ago of eating normal unbaked cheesecake and suffered for 2 days as a result. I wasn't happy!

    I am baffled. Any ideas why?

    Thanks,
    sparkly

     
  2. Hi
    First, my apologies as this isn't a cooking question - but it is a food one. I'm hoping someone on here will be able to answer my question!
    I have a problem with milk and cream in that they both upset my stomach a bit (and ice-cream too). I don't think I'm intolerant as such, as I can take very small quantities (I tend to avoid instead as it's much easier).
    But I can eat cheese and things that have cooked milk in them without consequence.
    One example is cheesecake. I love cheesecake, but now can only eat the New-York style baked variety. I made the mistake a couple of months ago of eating normal unbaked cheesecake and suffered for 2 days as a result. I wasn't happy!

    I am baffled. Any ideas why?

    Thanks,
    sparkly

     
  3. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    I'm not sure of the specifics, but it's something along the lines of the lactase (to which you are intolerant, I assume) goes with the whey whereas the cheese is made from the curds.
    And I suppose that as heat denatures any protein, that's why it's ok for you when the milk has been sufficiently heated.

    Not sure if that helps!!
     
  4. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    I don't know why but my son's best pal is lactose intolerant and is ok with cheese and ice cream but not milk according to his mother.
     
  5. That is typical of lactose intolerance, the process of making the cheese or cooking the milk removes the lactose. Also putting milk with other things makes it more digestable so cauliflower cheese is fine but a glass of milk will make you ill.

    You can buy lactose digesting enzimes from health food stores if you want to eat fresh cheesecake.



     
  6. That's really interesting, thank you all.
    I had no idea it could be actual lactose intolerance!

     
  7. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Sounds very like the sort of intolerance I have, but mine manifests itself as heavy cattarrh and hayfever type symptoms.
     
  8. I too am lactose intolerant and find any form of processed dairy far
    easier than milk - although I do find semi skimmed easier to digest than
    full fat! And the stuff that has been extra sieved - Pure or Cravendale - that seems to be a little easier to digest, though that might be a smell thing [​IMG]

    So welcome to the club, sparkly!
    Keep trying different ways of processing the milk/cream etc. And try all sorts of different products. I find low fat creme fraiche OK but not the sour cream. I can even do clotted cream, but not single - and I have no idea how that makes sense to my stomach as I know how clotted cream is made! If ice cream gets you you could try a diabetic version - the reduced sugar means the milk has to be heated more in order to set and keep!
    If you go to an allergist you will get told to switch to soya milk to something equally eeeeuuuuuuuuuuuurgh! I only ever argue with the woman at my doctor's surgery - so my best advice is to occasionally try a new type of dairy and see how it goes!
     
  9. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    I'm exactly the same. Lactofree is a bit of a revelation - ordinary milk is gross, but I can swig Lactofree, and it doesn't make me poorly.
     
  10. I've never tried lactofree, mandala. I think the milk replacements of the 80s put me off! Then again milk put me off so drinking a substitute probably isn;t going to happen soon!
    But I might buy some and give it a whirl. It might make cereal for breakfast easier!
     
  11. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    It's just like milk, but without the slimy grossness.
     
  12. You can always spot the genuine lactose intolerant from the 'I have a fashionable intolerance' (not getting at people with genuine allergies, getting at the self diagnosing types or buy a kit off the internet types).
    The genuine lactose intolerant will not bother about a bit of cheese in a sauce but the 'I'm fashionably dairy intolerant' will insist on no dairy at all.

    No if you are lactose intolerant you can handle a little cheese. If you have a milk alergy you will avaid the dairy but say you have an alergy.

    As far as I know 'dairy intolerant' does not exist.
     
  13. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Yes. This is genuine lactose intollerance. It is rare in Caucasians but very common in Asian/Arabic races, hence why liquid milk has little/no dietary role in the history of these countries, but cheese and/or yoghurt does as when processed this way the lactose is fermented by bacteria or altered by enzymes, both of which effectively remove it from the product.
    Heating does alter the lactose too. It binds to proteins in the milk and is the reason cheese browns when grilled, the top of a rice pudding browns and burnt milk is brown. It's called the Maillard reaction.
     

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