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Changing from secondar to primary

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by fchoudhury71, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. Dear Theo

    I have been teaching secondary Secondary ICT for the last 1o years o so and would like to go back teaching KS2. Can you please give me some advise on how i should go about doing this. I'm not sue what to include in my letter of application other than my experience which is now a it outdated. I have 7 years experience of teaching in a middle school.

    Look forward to hearing from you

    F
     
  2. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Oh dear!
    I can well understand your desire to teach Primary - I do voluntary work in primary now that I am retired.
    So, yes, you might WANT to teach primary - but the big question is: CAN you teach primary?
    In the last 10 years primary education in the UK has changed beyond all recognition. You have no experience of, familiarity with or understanding of the current primary curriculum. And even less of the current pedagogical trends, and all the assessment techniques.
    How would you do it?
    That's why I am asking: CAN you teach primary?
    Actually that is wrong - the big question is not CAN you teach primary, it is even worse: Why would any Head want you to teach Primary?
    Sorry!
    Although over the next few years the demographic trends show that there will be more primary-aged children, nothing so far has suggested that this will mean a lot more primary posts, as people are talking about increasing class sizes.
    I expect actually that there WILL be more posts, but currently there are large numbers, very large numbers, of primary teachers with recent PGCEs and recent experience who are unemployed. To be really really blunt: a Head would prefer to appoint them rather than you.
    In applying for primary posts, you will be up against 100 or 2000 - let me say that again so that you don't think that I have got too many zeroes in - one hundred or two hundred - other candidates, the vast majority with experience, recent experience, in primary.
    There is frankly nothing that you can do at present to get someone to pick you out of that pile of applications.
    Not what you wanted to hear, I know, but I believe in telling you the bald truth. I wouldn't want you to waste too much time and hopes on getting a primary post, because it is highly unlikely that you would.
    Best wishes
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
     
  3. Hmmm . . . I have to say that I don't take quite such a dim view of the situation asTheo, though i know that he has the bigger picture. I can only speak from my own experience . . .I trained as a secondary teacher back in the 1990s. Did my first year and then left teaching altogether. Spent the next 15 or 16 years in Management Development in large organisations, with the odd bit of volunteering at my own children's school, as a parent helper.
    When I started to think about going back to teaching and realising it was primary that I wanted rather than secondary, it was at a time when I had stopped working and was enjoying time at home with my new baby. I voluneered for two mornings a week - one morning hearing children read and the other working as a spare pair of hands in the classroom. Someone suggested that a way to find out if I actually wanted to teach primary would be to join a supply agency, which I did.
    The agency said that some Heads may not be keen to have a teacher who has not been trained to teach primary, however some might not mind. I only wanted to work part-time and enough work came in to keep me busy for the summer term. Within the first couple of weeks of that term I had secured a permanent post at a Junior school - not a school I had suplied at. At the time of applying, my application was based on the transferable skills I brought from my management development background, the one term of 2 mornings per week volunteering and about 3 days of primary supply. I know I was lucky and I found a school that was prepared to see past the fact that I hadn't trained to teach primary.
    My point is, if it's meant to happen for you, then you too will find that school that's willing to give you a chance. Supply teaching may be tricky depending on where you live - I know some areas have very little / no supply opportunities, but it won't hurt you to investigate and see what's out there. You have an advantage over me in that unless I have understood, middle school can include yrears 5 and 6 which means you are already teaching Junior school aged children.
    Good luck!
     
  4. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Glad that it went well for you, BackToTeaching, that's great.
    But I have just one question: when was this? Was it this academic year?
    Because things that were perhaps possible a year ago are not possible now.
    And if it was even longer than a year ago . . .
    Best wishes
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
     
  5. Fair point, Theo. My job started September 2010, so it was last academic year. I do think though, that if you want something enough, it's at least worth a try (but expectations do need to be managed!)
     

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