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Changes to exam appeal system

Discussion in 'Education news' started by Flere-Imsaho, Oct 14, 2015.

  1. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-34527646

    What do you think?

    Scotland dumped appeals and now, unless something happens on the day of the exam or just before, you have no appeal. You can ask for an admin check or a remark but simply getting a lower grade than expected is no longer grounds for appeal. Very few of these check/marks seem to produce a change.
     
  2. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    What did you expect??? In Scotland there is no Exam Regulator and so if things go wrong, hatches are battened down and two fingers put up. No one is held to account.
     
  3. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    Unlike you, I have a bit of faith in the marking process and think the lack of change is a good thing. Too many pupils get a decent prelim grade and think they can sit back and expect the same on the day of the exam. And too many parents think crying to SMT will change things.
     
  4. markuss

    markuss Occasional commenter

    When you read reports such as the one linked, you don't know how to take them - because the authors don't quite know what they're on about.

    For a start (clue) the BBC is saying there are exam boards nowadays - when there haven't been any for about fourteen years.

    What a Centre instigates in the first place is not an appeal, but an enquiry - and it's not paying for a re-mark. It's paying for a review. Anyone who's done such work will tell you that a review and a re-mark are quite different processes.

    So, the figures that the BBC quotes probably don't mean what the BBC thinks they mean.
     

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