1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

CfE Success Criteria and recording progress.

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by lescargot, May 22, 2011.

  1. lescargot

    lescargot Occasional commenter

    Subject is mod langs.
    We are in the process of redesigning what was an already perfectly good s1-s3 course with new courses, assessments and of course along with assessments come success criteria.
    Obviously, we are continuously assessing pupils both formatively and summatively (classwork, vocabulary tests, projects, presentations etc) and we have designed a 'pupil profile' to show how individual pupils have achieved certain outcomes. This is a lot of paperwork and very time consuming to do for each individual pupil - how are others recording and evidencing progress through the outcomes?
    Also, I am in the middle of creating writing/speaking assessments and want to produce Success Criteria so that a) pupils know how to achieve a certain level and b) so that teachers across the dept are being consistent i.e my level 3S is the same as the teacher next door. I would probably like to do the success criteria in the following manner -
    To achieve a level 3 Secure in this test you will have to; answer at least 8 questions, present yourself confidently, have good pronunciation, make yourself clearly understood, use linking words and express opinions (etc etc).
    However, my PTC thinks this is too prescriptive and we should be producing something more along the lines of a 'level 3 test' with pass or fail and individual teachers can then use class performance to decide whether pupils are D/C/S. My problem with this is it limits pupils to only being able to achieve a certain level, and that there is still no consistency. If we do not have clear success criteria and share these with pupils how do they know what is expected of them?
    The main point of this post is really to find out what others are doing. I would essentially be 'making up' criteria, as there has been nothing officially released, I would have to try to extract them from the E's and O's for the different levels.

     
  2. holdingon

    holdingon Occasional commenter

    do it "holistically" -forget the ticky boxes
     
  3. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    Excellent post. I'm ML too and I still have no clue about it all. All I know,is that apparently,we have reached a stage where every teacher should know all this and should be doing it with their classes. I still cannot get my head around it all and it's making real nervous. Any minute now someone will be telliing me off for not doing this or that.
     
  4. lescargot

    lescargot Occasional commenter

    Hee hee telling us off for not doing something we've not been told to do!!
    Holding on - can you explain what you mean in a bit more detail? Trying hard not to be thick here!
     
  5. I think that's what we're doing too! My take on the D/C/S thing is that one test can't differentiate like this. The skills at level 3 will be the same but it's the level of support, the context and the frequency of having proved competency at this level which will move children from developing to secure. For example in English the outcome might be "is able to create a convincing description of a personal experience". The developing level is being able to do that with teacher support and prompts to use imagery, good word choice, varied sentence structure etc. Secure is when the child is given the task and includes all these things without prompts and is "secure" in what makes a good piece of personal writing (ie, when they can make their own success criteria). They will probably have to do the task a few times to reach secure, although some will get there sooner than others. Does that help?
     
  6. Guidance from HMIe and LA has been not to get too bogged down in the detail of the outcomes. I suspect it's just a matter of teacher judgement but it takes a while to be able to make those judgements accurately without referring to the outcomes.
     
  7. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    What I mean is that apparently,we're all meant to have understood it all and we're are meant to teach and assess CfE style. I still don't understand it.
     
  8. lescargot

    lescargot Occasional commenter

    Hi airy
    It does help a wee bit, however, still not sure how to communicate this to pupils or how to 'assess' it summatively if that is the case!
     
  9. lescargot

    lescargot Occasional commenter

    Catmum, I know what you meant, was asking Holdingon what they meant by 'holistically'!
     
  10. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    Just goes to show you how confused I am!
     
  11. lescargot

    lescargot Occasional commenter

  12. I used to work with SVQs where learners had to create a folio of evidence to show that they had become competent in outcomes and I think along the same lines with CfE. One piece of evidence can't really show "secure" because the pupil has to show he or she can do these things in a range of contexts. You might need a range of tests/pieces of work to show a pupil is secure in one area and it's about building up extensive evidence. Having said that, I think you can assess summatively by giving a test of skills and seeing if the pupil can use those skills independently in an unfamiliar context. I would still give a final grade based on an amalgamation of class and test work.
     
  13. holdingon

    holdingon Occasional commenter

    absolutely spot on -don't get bogged down with the assessment
    ticky boxes don't help anyone -scotvec used to love them
     
  14. lescargot

    lescargot Occasional commenter

    This is becoming clear. The issue here is we are so used to marking skills individually in MFL eg speaking, writing, listening, reading. So, I would really like to be able to say a pupil is 'secure' in the speaking skill, but maybe still 'developing' in writing so overall they would maybe be 'consolidating' in all four skills. Am I making any sense? Just feel like I am having to make my subject 'fit' something that isn't really suitable!
     
  15. holdingon

    holdingon Occasional commenter

    if you are secure at level 3 are you developing at level 4

    it is a mess I am afraid
     
  16. I'm in English and we give different grades for Reading, Writing and Talking And Listening. I think our MFL dept. do the same because we all count as "languages". I think it's hard to develop a test which covers all outcomes but we quite often give tasks where reading or listening to a text moves into writing or talking. I think it does fit quite well with MFL - in terms of vocabulary, I might see a developing pupil be able to learn a set list of specialist vocabulary and then use it in a simple test/task the next day. A secure pupil will be able to use that vocabulary six months later when it just happens to come up as part of a conversation.
     
  17. In some ways, yes. In others, the skills at level 4 are different from those at level 3. I'm pretty sure people though 5-14 was just as complicated when it first appeared - it's only a level D if it meets 3 points above the dotted line and two under it - but eventually you internalise it, chat enough with colleagues to figure out some consistency and we'll all be happily slapping grades on work instinctively soon.
     
  18. lescargot

    lescargot Occasional commenter

    Whilst I do see what you're saying Airy and think I could choose those in my classes who are D/C/S, I just don't see a practical way of evidencing and recording this kind of progress. Call me old fashioned but I think that's important.
     
  19. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    Does it actually matter as they are obviously all going to pass? Pass what,we are not too sure.
     
  20. The evidence is their jotters, records of spoken assessments, written work etc. I'm not suggesting that you pull a number and letter out of the air but that, with use, the outcomes and levels come naturally.
     

Share This Page