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CfE - Curriculum for Extroverts

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by nittygritty, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. Susan Cain?s book ?Quiet: The Power of Introverts In a World That Can't Stop Talking? should be cause for reflection in the ranks of the CfE zealots:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17510163

    http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.html

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-power-of-introverts


    Cain argues that although a third of the population are introverts, most institutions e.g. schools are geared towards extroverts, while introverts are often undervalued or misunderstood. If CfE is not a curriculum (clearly) but a set of aims and methodologies, it may well be biased against the introverted pupil. Does the introvert get the space and peace in the CfE ?active learning? environment to thrive? Cain also debunks the efficacy of groupwork thesis, a CfE centrepiece: ?If you have talented and motivated people, they should be encouraged to work alone when creativity or efficiency is the highest priority." (Scientific American 24.1.12)
     
  2. Susan Cain?s book ?Quiet: The Power of Introverts In a World That Can't Stop Talking? should be cause for reflection in the ranks of the CfE zealots:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17510163

    http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.html

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-power-of-introverts


    Cain argues that although a third of the population are introverts, most institutions e.g. schools are geared towards extroverts, while introverts are often undervalued or misunderstood. If CfE is not a curriculum (clearly) but a set of aims and methodologies, it may well be biased against the introverted pupil. Does the introvert get the space and peace in the CfE ?active learning? environment to thrive? Cain also debunks the efficacy of groupwork thesis, a CfE centrepiece: ?If you have talented and motivated people, they should be encouraged to work alone when creativity or efficiency is the highest priority." (Scientific American 24.1.12)
     
  3. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Interesting. There was a thread recently on the Personal forum about introversion and extroversion and I do find the terms simplistic; I'm glad you offered some links.
    Which I've looked at and read . . . . but I'm still feeling like something is missing. That's because all of the articles fail to explore motivation.
    If you put a gun to my head I can be extrovert . . . . or extrovert, depending on the threat or encouragement.
    With the correct carrot and stick children can alter and modify their behaviour in the classroom, regardless of what their primary instinctual response may be. We all have over-ride buttons to be pressed.
    No?
     
  4. But why hold a gun to someone's head the whole time they are in the classroom? We want to get the best from children and while encouraging a flexibility of approach is a good thing, it should work both ways.
     
  5. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    It was an extreme analogy, airy, nothing more
     
  6. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Eeek! That should have read;
    If you put a gun to my head I can be extrovert . . . . or introvert

     
  7. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    on environmental stressors . . . .I might add . . .I thought it was explicit, but perhaps not . .
     
  8. No, I got that. I just thought you seemed to want to apply those stresses in order to get children to conform and that seemed odd.
     
  9. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Only sometimes [​IMG]

     
  10. gnulinux

    gnulinux Occasional commenter

    TROLLS!
     
  11. lol. Do you even know what a troll is? I would have thought an IT teacher would know that a troll is:

    Someone who posts a deliberately provocative message to an internet forum with the intention of causing a heated argument.

    I don't see any of that in the posts above.

    However, a single post which has nothing to do with the thread and directly antagonises one or more of the posters in the thread is inherently TROLLish.
     
  12. I have to say that in situations where it is my learning that is the issue I prefer to work on my own via traditional methods and not working in a group. Have always wondered about the wee quiet souls and how they cope with all this active learning. Not against it but what happened to different educational needs? I cringe at groupwork and roleplay and am a quivering wreck at presentations but it doesn't mean I'm not capable, just have a different set of skills that enables me to do loads of stuff that others can't.
     
  13. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    I've replied to you on the other thread where you have made the same claim.
     
  14. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    I think 'active learning' has been discussed at some length on this forum and in general an understanding of the term was reached; not so much to do with physical activity and more to do with an active brain.
    Surely a wee quiet soul's efforts in these types of activity will be assessed on content rather than style, just as will the loud, noisy kid's work.
    Then of course there's the lazy kid . . . . of either extrovert or introvert persuasion. Perhaps the methodologies associated with CfE simply provide them with more opportunity to do nothing?

     
  15. Ha ha! Yes, I can sometimes relate to that but I think I'd be wanting to induce the introverted behaviour not encourage the extroverts any further!
     
  16. If you follow me around posting that every time I post...
     
  17. amysdad

    amysdad Established commenter

    The thing is what the likes of Susan Cain are saying isn't to do with physical activity - it's about how the mind works and how someone thinks something through. I'm very much on the "introvert" side of Cain's argument - I don't like groupwork (never did at school either) and hate being forced to make a decision without being given time either to construct my argument or to consider alternatives. In groupwork, that's exactly what happens.


    There's other research, by people like Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, which substantiates much of what Cain says (Cain's problem, as with Diane Senechal, is that although they make good points they don't back it up with academic research) in that there are some pupils who work much better on their own and will produce work which is of a higher quality if they are able to work in a way which suits their skills and abilities rather than those of the latest fashion (ensuring that every child has the right education for them - GIRFEC, anyone?)



    But when the noisy kid dominates the group and makes sure the work reflects his views, if those views are **** then the quiet, reflective kid will be marked down (I know, I've been there!)



    Totally agree...
     
  18. Yes I agree and if the latest fashion is groupwork, that's not likely to nurture the learning development of the introvert. If, as Mark Priestley asserted in the Scotsman recently is true, that, "The past ten years has ...seen plenty of change in learning and teaching methods in our classrooms, particularly a wholesale move to group-based learning in many schools" , then a re-assessment of classroom practice is necessary. Wholesale is fortunately not what I see in my school.

    http://www.scotsman.com/news/mark-priestley-let-s-get-learning-up-to-date-1-2205641
     
  19. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Well this is the crux of the matter to me, though I do get what amysdad is saying . . . .in every secondary classroom there will be a set of classroom rules . . . it's the behaviour of the so called extroverts that mostly contravenes the code of conduct . . . .so the discussion is further distilled and the question becomes 'Is CfE a Curriculum for the badly behaved?', which then makes the discussion more about classroom management than learning styles.
     
  20. cochrane1964

    cochrane1964 New commenter

    Really good post. Many of my quieter kids are struggling in the new CfE environment but the king's new clothes demand preppy cheerleading approach to everything.
     

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