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CD of the Week

Discussion in 'Music' started by mmiicchhaaeelll, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. In every Key Stage Three lesson our students complete a task called 'CD of the Week' where they listen to a piece of music and complete a differentiated worksheet.
    The idea is that the music is really vartied and they are exposed to as many different styles, genres and traditions as possible. The worksheet requires them to use technical vocab whilst thinking about Tempo, Dynamics, Timbre and Mood as well as some other key words like Legato, Arco, Accelerando etc. The task should take a maximum of 15 mins, and ideally only takes the first 10mins of a lesson.
    I've been doing this for a about three years now and I can really see the benefits - students are able to discuss and describe pieces of music in the main part of the lesson in alot of detail, this has obvious advantages for those who continue onto KS4 or 5 and beyond.
    I'm after your opinion on the CD of the Week task. It could be looked on as being quite dated since the movement away from teaching secondary music through 'musical elements', but it does work!
    What do you think?
     
  2. In every Key Stage Three lesson our students complete a task called 'CD of the Week' where they listen to a piece of music and complete a differentiated worksheet.
    The idea is that the music is really vartied and they are exposed to as many different styles, genres and traditions as possible. The worksheet requires them to use technical vocab whilst thinking about Tempo, Dynamics, Timbre and Mood as well as some other key words like Legato, Arco, Accelerando etc. The task should take a maximum of 15 mins, and ideally only takes the first 10mins of a lesson.
    I've been doing this for a about three years now and I can really see the benefits - students are able to discuss and describe pieces of music in the main part of the lesson in alot of detail, this has obvious advantages for those who continue onto KS4 or 5 and beyond.
    I'm after your opinion on the CD of the Week task. It could be looked on as being quite dated since the movement away from teaching secondary music through 'musical elements', but it does work!
    What do you think?
     
  3. My inclination is that if it works, then do it! I imagine that students feel more empowered if they feel they can speak with some authority aboiut the music they hear, and it does no harm to widen their musical world a bit.
    Having said that, I still refer regularly to musical elements! I don't see why students should not be encouraged to think about their music in these terms.
     
  4. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    It will also help those studying for ABRSM exams. I'm thinking of the aural test question that asks them to identify the characteristic features of a piece - dynamics, tempo, texture, structure, character, style and period etc. So often the most difficult question for the pupil. They tend not to think about the composer or period of music that the pieces were written that they are playing for the exam even!
    I think it is great what you are doing! I used to have to lead assembly once a week and I always took time to talk about the music that was being played as the pupils came in - setting the period, composer, instruments etc. So useful to the 'general knowledge' of a musician.
     
  5. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    Sounds like an excellent idea to me. As exemplified by many DJs and pop critics, few people have the skill to articulate ideas about music (as opposed to lyrics, stardom, clothes etc). Even in exams for musicians, many fall back on irrelevant facts instead of confronting the subject head on.
     
  6. trelassick

    trelassick New commenter

    Great idea. Often listen with verbal discussion in class like this - I try to elicit a response from every single child. Do you use a general worksheet that can be applied to any piece, or do you design them for specific pieces?
     
  7. silverfern

    silverfern New commenter

    Agree it's a good idea. Excellent preparation for GCSE listening paper, IB Diploma listening paper...
    I think that being able to discuss musical features using correct terminology is an important skill that takes time to develop. It means we can take students from, 'I like it coz it has a good beat', to 'I like it because the syncopation and fast tempo give the music rhythmic interest'.
    Students 'listen' to music all the time on their ipods, etc, but are they really 'listening', or just being 'washed over' with sound? Teaching them to 'listen' critically will enable them to develop a more discerning (and possibly wider) taste in music. Well... we can live in hope!
    Seems like a great way to differentiate too. I'd be interested in the questions you ask...

     
  8. An example of the type of worksheet you are using would be helpful, as we could see how you are structuring it.
    I will help in any way I can.

     
  9. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    I also do this. I originally got the idea from my mentor when I was training. It works really well.
     
  10. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    When did that happen?
     
  11. With the introduction of the National Strategy for Music. A lot of people ignored it though and carried on regardless!
     
  12. So I'm sat at work, putting my photocopying in to the office and I come to do the CD of the Week sheets and remember about this thread. I'd forgotten that I'd been asked to add the worksheets so you guys could have a look, but here they are: https://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/CD-of-the-Week-6109410/
    This is just two of them, the most basic (with all the definitions) and the hardets (essentially, just a lined piece of paper with no structure) there are several others in the middle that get progressivley harder. There are also sheets that are designed for specific genres of music, for example rock of folk where there are key words specific to the music.

    I'd appreciate any more thoughts you have with regard to the initial post [​IMG]
    Thanks
     
  13. Lots of listening - excellent idea! This is the bit that all my students have found hardest in the GCSE!
     

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