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Cashing in?

Discussion in 'English' started by molly0967, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. molly0967

    molly0967 New commenter

    Could somebody please explain the term 'cashing in' and the associated rules/timescales? We are doing WJEC English Lang and Lit.
     
  2. CandysDog

    CandysDog Established commenter

    Everything below assumes you're talking about GCSE, not AS or A Level:
    'Cashing-in' (or claiming a subject award) is when a school tells the exam board that they want to claim an overall grade for a student doing a modular course.
    It's made just like an entry for an exam or controlled assessment unit (with the same entry deadlines), through your examinations officer.
    For GCSE, there is a rule that a student must be entered for at least 40% of the assessment must be completed at the same timeas cashing-in. This may be controlled assessment unit if you wish (though it's not possible for English Lit, as CA is only 25%).
    When a student cashes in, the exam board works out their overall grade by adding up their UMS marks for a total out of 200. 100 is D, 120 is C, 140 is B etc. The exam board will automatically count the best mark if re-sits have been taken (so long as the re-sit isn't part of the 40% terminal assessment, in which case it has to count).
    On results day, the student then gets a final GCSE grade. If he/she wants to re-sit anything again, he/she technically takes the same GCSE again (though they are allowed to carry results forward, so long as they re-fulfil the 40% terminal assessment rule).
    GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature are separate GCSEs, so may be cashed-in at different times if desired.
    Timescales are complicated because of the impending change from modular to linear GCSE specs in England. The possiblities are:
    • January 2013: Possible to cash-in GCSE English Language and GCSE English
    • Summer 2013: Possible to cash-in GCSE English Language, GCSE English and, for the last time, GCSE English Literature
    • November 2013: Last chance to cash-in GCSE English Language and GCSE English
    • Summer 2014+:GCSE English Language, GCSE English Literature and GCSE English available as linear courses
    • November 2014+: GCSE English Language and GCSE English available as linear courses
    If you're in Wales or Northern Ireland, modular courses will continue to be available. It is possible to cash-in English Language every January, Summer and, from 2013, November. English Literature may be cashed-in every summer. It will also be possible to do the linear courses when they come in. There is no GCSE English outside England, so that will be linear only.
     
  3. sunflower48

    sunflower48 New commenter

    CandysDog I am impressed with your knowledge of how all this works. Are you an examiner for WJEC as the rest of us don't seem to be able to understand this at all!!! Thanks for trying to help us out though, it is appreciated.
     
  4. Maresa Brand

    Maresa Brand New commenter

    But also when linear you can take the exam in November Year 11? But not "Cash in"?


     
  5. Maresa Brand

    Maresa Brand New commenter

    As in Year Ten from this September will follow Linear but can take Unit 1 in November 2013 without cashing in? This means that you can re-enter those under UMS in June 2014 and then all will cash in? This will be the new system and effectively is two chances at the exam? That is what AQA said when I phoned them?
     
  6. CandysDog

    CandysDog Established commenter

    I do examine for WJEC, but only as a bottom of the rung standard marker.
    I guess I'm just good at reading information of their website and thinking through the consequences.
     
  7. CandysDog

    CandysDog Established commenter

    That's not possible, as far as I know. Students taking an exam in November 2013 would have to cash-in then if they wanted it to count, as that is the final modular series.
    What they could do is take the exam (only one English Language/English exam under AQA) in November 2013, while submitting their controlled assessment and cashing-in (effectively doing it linear) and then re-sit in summer 2013. They would have to take the exam again (and the result would definitely count), but the controlled assessment could be carried forward from November. This model would continue to work under the fully linear specs.
    Alternatively, if you did want your Year 10 students to have a chance at modular, they could do their first attempt at the exam in the summer of 2013 (without entering anything else) and then they could re-sit as necessary, submit their controlled assessment and cash-in in November 2013. This would mean that their best exam result would count. Then - if they really had to - they could do a linear re-sit in summer 2014 as well (though you're best of leaving that session to focus on English Lit!).
    But if AQA are saying differently, you may want to check back with them, as they will know more than me!
     
  8. molly0967

    molly0967 New commenter

    Thank you so much for replying to my post about cashing in but....I am still not sure I fully understand! I am really sorry to appear so daft, I have very little experience and noboy to ask for advice!
    So ' cashing in' really means you are informing the exam board that you want that result to count towards the final GCSE result at the end of Year 11? I don't understand what you mean when you say 'cash in' in January or at other times?
     
  9. CandysDog

    CandysDog Established commenter

    Not quite. The exam board will automatically count all module results towards a student's final GCSE grade (automatically counting the best re-sit where possible etc.).
    Cashing-in is telling the exam board that you want the student's final grade to be calculated at the end of that exam series. The board will automatically calculate the student's overall grade by using the modules he/she has taken so far and the modules he/she takes at the same time as cashing-in.
    As I said above, there is a rule that 40% of the GCSE's assessment must
    be submitted by the student at the same time as cashing-in (and if this
    can only be made up by using a re-sit, then the re-sit will definitely
    count).
    Cashing-in does not have to be done at the end of Year 11. It can be done in the summer of Year 10, for example. In GCSE English Language and GCSE English, cashing-in can also be done in January. When a student cashes-in, he/she gets his/her overall grade: they do not have to wait until the end of Year 11.
    If you are in England, summer 2013 is the last chance to cash-in modular GCSE English Literature and November 2013 (moved forward from January) is the last chance to cash-in modular GCSE English Language/GCSE English. After that, it is back to linear courses, where everything is submitted at the end of the course (which, again, can still be an 'early entry' if a school desires).
     
  10. molly0967

    molly0967 New commenter

    Cashing-in is telling the exam board that you want the student's final grade to be calculated at the end of that exam series.
    So by the exam series, do you mean the end of the 2 year course? What is the point of cashing in in January or November? Why do they need an 'interim' calculation? Or do you mean by cashing in, their GCSE is complete? If Year 10 completed Eng Lit in one year for example?
    Again, thank you for explaining all this.
     
  11. CandysDog

    CandysDog Established commenter

    An exam series is just the times of the year when exams take place. We have the summer exam series, the January exam series etc. It is only possible to cash-in when there is an exam series and it offers the opportunity for a cash-in entry.
    A student would cash-in in January or November to get a GCSE early. Often, schools want English Language 'in the bag' before the end of Year 11 (for their precious league tables), so cashing-in early would allow them to do this. Also, English Language and English Literature are increasingly being taken separately by some schools (a school may do one in Year 10 and another in Year 11, for example). An 'early' cash-in makes this possible.
    It is impossible to get an interim calculation, much to heads' annoyance.
    Exactly.
     

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