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Cashing in AS levels: disadvantage to state schools

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by twentysix, Feb 9, 2011.

  1. According to colleagues, State schools have to cash in all exams from June as funding is now linked to cashing in. Is this right?

    Which presumably means a poor AS grade will be visible to universities. Whereas those of us in the private sector will not cash in any poor grades so they don't appear on a students records.

    That can't be right can it?

    Can anyone shed light on this?
     
  2. Hi Twentysix, This is indeed correct. For funding purpose which is mainly linked to success rates by which schools are judged by LEAs, Government and OFSTED schools cash in their AS grades. Though this does not stop retakes.
    Your comments regarding poor grades is also true. So when students now complete UCAS forms in the pending could be added (and it still can) but Universites could potentially look these up.
    I'm not entirely sure how this will used by Universities but to again answer your question yes we will cash in.

     

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