1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Carousel lesson KS4

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by eviotti, May 3, 2012.

  1. Hello all!

    I am looking for some ideas/advice.

    I am planning a carousel lesson for my Y10 about the topic of the environment. I was thinking of doing one 'station' per skill but I don't really know how it works as I have never done a carousel lesson (if you're a trainee, raise your hand!) I want it to be competitive yet differentiated....

    My pupils have seen the topic already so it would be mostly revision. I was thinking, for the reading: an article to understand, the speaking, use of my TA and I have yet to think of the other...

    Any input (from the sort of activities to the time each of them should last) from people who have done it before would be greatly appreciated!


    emeline
     
  2. Hello all!

    I am looking for some ideas/advice.

    I am planning a carousel lesson for my Y10 about the topic of the environment. I was thinking of doing one 'station' per skill but I don't really know how it works as I have never done a carousel lesson (if you're a trainee, raise your hand!) I want it to be competitive yet differentiated....

    My pupils have seen the topic already so it would be mostly revision. I was thinking, for the reading: an article to understand, the speaking, use of my TA and I have yet to think of the other...

    Any input (from the sort of activities to the time each of them should last) from people who have done it before would be greatly appreciated!


    emeline
     
  3. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    I did it for the first time in my NQT year and it worked very well, so I've done it quite often since. I wouldn't do more than 4 workstations, and make them quite specific. I think I had one station of speaking with me (oral questions at the time), one station of a simple reading exercice, one station of a grammar exercice and possibly one of vocabulary learning, or something like that (putting different learning skills into practice). Have plenty of help sheets on each workstation so it's absolutely idi0t-proof, as you won't be able to help because you are speaking with one group. Make sure pupils know what sheets to take with them and which ones to leave behind. Make sure they know which way round to move, and put a timer on the projector so they can manage their time effectively. It's a great way of getting short bursts of energy out of your pupils, and they usually love it (my observer did, she said it was a risky lesson and she liked that!).
     
  4. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    PS: Timewise, take away a good 10-15 minutes from your overall lesson time for explanations and moving around, then split the rest of the time into the number of groups. I'd start off with just three groups perhaps - it's easier to manage, even if it means the groups are bigger.
     
  5. I o a lot of carousel lessons where the students are not expected to move at a certain time, or indeed to attempt each activity; indeed I activel discourage it. I tend to put a range of skill areas out and wok at a range o abilities, or targeting a range of linguistic objectives. I mark everything with an "out of 3" difficulty rating and expect them to complete activities that relate to their personal linguistic targets (language purpose highlighted on each Ali). The students really appreciate these lessons - it gives them chance to really consolidate.
     
  6. A card activity might be good for one station eg matching environmental problems to solutions. They could match them up, play pairs, test each other etc. then you get vocab, reading and speaking.
     
  7. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter

    Is there some way you could do a listening station? I've done this before using the MP3 players we have for A level listening exams, it means pupils can work through a listening task at their own pace and maybe choose a differentiated task (e.g. a gapfill with missing words given in box for one version, with clues/the first letter for another version, and no help for the hardest one).
     

Share This Page