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Career Progression

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by sporty9, Nov 27, 2011.

  1. I am a 41 year old male primary teacher, on M3 and wish to progress in teaching. Could anyone please offer me some advice regarding career progression towards deputy/assistant headship.
    Thank you.
     
  2. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    The first bit of advice is never to mention your gender. What has that to do with anything?
    I'm afraid that you've annoyed me now, and I shall go away and just plain sulk.
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  3. Touche.
     
  4. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    My advice is - stop thinking that your age and gender are important to the rest of us and focus on being the best teacher you can be. Then, when you're absolutely on top of your classroom practice, think about taking on responsibility in school - for a subject to begin with, later a key stage.
    Build up as much of this middle management leadership experience as you can, still developing your skills and practice as a classroom teacher (because the need to be the best practitioner never goes away - staff need to see that you lead by example) and look constantly for initiatives, etc you can take on, develop and 'finish' such that you can show tangible results from your leadership of them.
    That's how you make yourself into someone a head might want as their deputy.
     
  5. Ah! Interesting.... nothing to disagree with in principle... however - having had one or two deputy headship interviews in the last six months and having just been offered a post - I can't recall any questions on classroom practice featuring in the processes. My experience is in a different phase of education but I would advise looking at identifying the skill set that a future employer would want in a senior leader in the school... management of crises, motivation of staff, coordination of whole school activities, compliance w.r.t. standards/inspections, engagement with parents, child protection awareness, staff development, resolution of problems, training/induction/appraisal.... butmostly - I think a head needs someone they can rely on for advice, support and shared enthusiasm.
     
  6. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    OK, I've just come back from a morning's teaching Reception. Let's look at what you are asking.
    Heads and Deputy Heads are Leaders. Leaders in everything. Some schools actually call the Head the Lead Learner. You need to be able to lead others.
    Lead them by having top-of-the-range classroom skills; you will have absolutely no credibility with staff unless you have that. The Governors and Ofsted both will look towards you to ensure that the quality of learning and teaching in the school is of absolute top quality. So you have to know what you are talking about, and be prepared to show that you can practice what you preach.
    Then you need to lead in curriculum development and delivery; becoming a subject co-ordinator (for one or more subjects) is usually pretty easy in most Primaries, as there are lots of these responsibilities to share around. A role as a KS co-ordinator would be the next step.
    You also need to be pretty pro-active, rather than reactive. Seen or read about something new? Think it might be good for the pupils in your school? Why not bring it up at staff meeting, suggest that you investigate it a bit more and report back in a couple of weeks. You might even come up with a proposal to trial it and then evaluate it.
    But don't think that being a man rather than a woman has anything to do with it!
    Best wishes
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     

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