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Career progression - options?

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by rosaespanola, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter


    I'm in my 5th year of teaching MFL in a secondary school and I feel
    that I'm ready for something new, but I'm not sure where I want my
    career to progress from here.
    My ideal thing would be to become an
    AST (or something similar) but I'm not sure how feasible this is - I've
    looked online to find out about it and it seems to come down to whether
    there's already an AST in my subject in another school nearby and
    whether my school can be persuaded to pay me the extra to become an AST.
    In the current budget-cut climate, I can't imagine many schools being
    overly keen on this.
    The other obvious things are head of
    department, which I really don't think I'd like to do, or lead
    teacher/2nd in department, both of which would mean moving schools as
    the people currently in these posts aren't going anywhere. The other
    thing would be head of year, which doesn't sound bad but I've had no
    experience of doing anything like this so it could be a bit of a baptism
    of fire - I'm worried about biting off more than I can chew!
    Is
    there anything I'm missing here? I don't really know what other options
    might be open to me for progression, I'd much prefer to stay in my
    current school but I am feeling like I'm ready to take on something
    different.
     
  2. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter


    I'm in my 5th year of teaching MFL in a secondary school and I feel
    that I'm ready for something new, but I'm not sure where I want my
    career to progress from here.
    My ideal thing would be to become an
    AST (or something similar) but I'm not sure how feasible this is - I've
    looked online to find out about it and it seems to come down to whether
    there's already an AST in my subject in another school nearby and
    whether my school can be persuaded to pay me the extra to become an AST.
    In the current budget-cut climate, I can't imagine many schools being
    overly keen on this.
    The other obvious things are head of
    department, which I really don't think I'd like to do, or lead
    teacher/2nd in department, both of which would mean moving schools as
    the people currently in these posts aren't going anywhere. The other
    thing would be head of year, which doesn't sound bad but I've had no
    experience of doing anything like this so it could be a bit of a baptism
    of fire - I'm worried about biting off more than I can chew!
    Is
    there anything I'm missing here? I don't really know what other options
    might be open to me for progression, I'd much prefer to stay in my
    current school but I am feeling like I'm ready to take on something
    different.
     
  3. ferrisbueller

    ferrisbueller New commenter

    If you want to stay in the same school, but looking for career progression then I would go and speak to the Headteacher and let them know.

     
  4. I think you need to be more clear about why you want a change and how you want your career to progress. Imho somebody who goes for any promotion (pastoral, T&L, management etc) can come across as self-interested and just after more money. From reading your post it sounds as though this isn't you; you are just ready for a new challenge and need a change. I would consider what you'd like from a new role and then approach your Head for the likelihood of something becoming available. They may not have the money for an AST, but they may have the time in the time table / a TLR / a bursary for someone to do some mentoring in T&L or for an ITT coordinator for example. What do you think?
     
  5. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter

    The head is aware that I'm interested in taking on something new - he actually approached me a while ago and we had a silly conversation in which he was clearly trying to subtly find out if I'm thinking of leaving (I have a very long commute, and petrol prices and snow issues being what they are lately, it's not surprising he might wonder if I might be looking for something closer to home) and I was being as non-committal as possible! I did make it clear that in an ideal world I'd prefer to stay at my current school but that I'm ready for something new in my job and if there aren't any opportunities where I am now then I might have to look at moving on at some point in the future. He certainly seemed encouraging - he didn't mention any opportunities that he knew of, but I'm hoping that if anything does come up then he'll have me in mind.
     
  6. With all due respect it simply sounds like you see 'progression' as something you are meant to do rather than really wanting to progress.
    The two posts to me come over as all the reasons not to try and move 'onwards and upwards'. I have known teachers to stay in the classroom for 30-40 years and simply develop their skills in that area, sevice the kids and school.
    Movement is not required, perhaps look to find something personally to keep your interested in something?
    Your point about wanting to leave seems strange too as you say you want to stay?
    How about a masters (if you dont have one?) or writing a book?
     
  7. David Getling

    David Getling Senior commenter

    Betamale makes an excellent point, and not just for teaching. It's all too common to imagine one has to move "up the career ladder", even at the expense of giving up a job you enjoy.

    When I worked in I.T. I avoided the drudgery of management by doing freelance work.

    As a maths teacher, I enjoy being in the classroom, and have no desire to swap any of my time there to indulge in paper pushing. Moving upwards might mean more money, but it can also mean less happiness and contentment. Which do you value more?
     
  8. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter

    To the two previous posters - I think I've made it fairly clear that by "progression" I mean taking on something new and I haven't even mentioned wanting more money, have I? I'm well aware that there's nothing wrong with continuing on indefinitely as a classroom teacher, but as I said, personally I feel that I'm ready for new challenges or responsibilities at this point in my career. What better reason can there be for wanting to "move onwards and upwards" as Betamale put it? I'm certainly not just looking to move up the career ladder for the sake of it and I don't think I've given any suggestion of that in my posts.
    Betamale - to clear up your confusion re "Your point about wanting to leave seems strange too as you say you want to stay?". I don't want to leave, and if you read my posts again you'll see that I haven't said at any point that I want to leave. But it's not difficult to see that if there are no opportunities to take on anything new in my current school then I would have to make the choice between staying at the school I'm happy in but not having the opportunity to do new things in my career, or moving to a school that can offer me more opportunities. I'm fairly sure this situation isn't terribly unusual.

     
  9. Ditto that
    Time/quality of life is far more important than sitting in meetings with people I may not value or respect til 6pm just for the cash and 'status'

    ...and breathe.....
    With all due respect that rant has neither furthered any understanding or cleared up points that were vague in the original post. It was little more than an uncultured (and uncalled for) ramble
    I caught the last line about the situation being unusual. The desire to progress is not unusual, having no idea what you want to do or why other than feeling you should is probably is the focus of most of the responses posted, not just mine.
    Question such as "what have peoples experiences of becoming a 2ic been like?" or "did you feel the transisition to SLT was the right one?" are more likely to yield direction for you.
    If I was a head/principle and someone said "I want to progress" and I said "well what is your chosen direction" and the response "Dont know, I just want to progress" my response would not be one filled with massive enthusiasm.
    (and thats without the 'snow' concerns)

     
  10. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter

    Well gosh, I'm not sure how to respond to you here. I'm not looking for an argument, my response to you wasn't a rant or a ramble and I don't think most people would have seen it as such. I'm not sure what you mean by "uncultured", but I think my response was called for in that you seemed to have misinterpreted what I was saying in my other posts so I wanted to clarify that I'm looking for something new in my career, not just trying to get more money or move a step up on the career ladder. I thought that I'd made this fairly clear in my first post and the third commenter certainly seems to have recognised this, but my apologies if what I said was ambiguous. I agree that it would not be a good thing to say to my headteacher that I'm looking for progression but have no idea in which direction - this is why I posted on here, to discuss the various options that might be open to me so I can before I approach the head, as I'm not sure what opportunities there might be other than the obvious ones I mentioned.
    I don't think there's any point us continuing this conversation as it's obviously not very constructive in helping me get the information I'm looking for, and as I've said, I'm not interested in an argument over any of this.
     
  11. frymeariver

    frymeariver New commenter

    I'm not sure that your posts are particularly misleading rosaespanola. In fact - if I am reading them correctly - I think you are in a situation many people find themselves in at some point in their career: you have become settled in your current school, at which you like working, but are beginning to feel that you need a new challenge. However, opportunities where you are currently working are limited so there is no obvious next step. The fact that you are concerned about moving to another school for promotion is fairly typical I would say: a step into the unknown can be very daunting!
    As for advice? Maybe you should look at taking on some opportunties in your current department/school to build up your experience of, in particular, leading and managing other staff. This will soon tell you what your strengths are, what you need to develop, and what direction you might wish to take in the future.
    Good luck.
     
  12. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter

    Thanks for that - you've summed up the whole thing very accurately! [​IMG]
    The issue is working out what opportunities might be available, aside from the HoD/HoY route. The roles available seem to vary a lot between schools and it's not always easy to find out what the opportunities might be. I'm reluctant to just wait until something comes up as I don't want to seem like I'm applying for anything and everything, I'd prefer to be more proactive and be able to approach my head with a clearer idea of what direction I'd like to go in. Cheers for your advice.
     
  13. The two things though are not universally parallel.
    • Career Progression is a challenege
    • A challenege doesnt have to be a career progression
    Opportunities can be to deliver outstanding lessons day in day out. Opportunities are to share learning through publishing work. Opportunities can be to gain a Masters, PhD or do some research in your field.
    The idea of feeling you must move into management/become a mentor/take on more responsibilities is not the progression all should feel they need to follow. If there is a burning passion and direction, 100% support that but a new challenge should not have to fit into the career path that many follow and being stagnant is not a reason to want to move on.
    Teaching and management is not a natural progression for many, taking a TLR for a wishy washy additional duty IMO is not for all and status of being someone is not required by some.
    I just seem to think that the idea of 'progession for progessions sake' really isnt conducive to quality practice.
     
  14. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter

    I think we've already established that I'm not interested in 'progession for progessions sake', so I'm not going to waste time repeating myself except to reiterate that at no point have I said that my aim is to get a TLR or extra money. I'm really not looking for a debate about people's motivation for wanting new challenges in their career so I'd appreciate it if people could stick to offering constructive suggestions that answer the questions in my original post.
     
  15. You explained all of the above in the last post, hence why I didnt respond to, or quote you. I was merely addressing a point made by somebody else which I found interesting and bypassed the hostility.
    The direction of a thread in a public forum often takes a slightly different direction when additional points for discussion arise yet essentially the topic remains on the same lines. You have the ability to flag posts up to the people who police the board if you feel I have violated the forum rules in any capacity.
     
  16. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter

    I have done already, thanks. There has never been any 'hostility' from my side, I've simply responded to your posts in a polite manner and explained that you've misinterpreted what I'd previously said - I've found it surprising and not particularly relevant to anyone's previous posts that you've continued to argue about this business of 'progression for progression's sake' when no-one has actually disagreed with you on that point, and I feel that it's probably off-putting to anyone who might want to respond to my original questions as your posts have been quite confrontational and unpleasant towards me and to the last person who commented. If that wasn't your intention then fair enough, but you need to be aware that this is how you're coming across.
    Discussion closed, I won't be checking this thread again. Thanks to everyone else who commented.
     

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