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Career change - teaching to childminding. Advice please?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by FoundationStage!, Mar 26, 2011.

  1. I am an excessively broody nursery teacher. My husband and I lost our
    first baby in November. It was an ectopic pregnancy and I had keyhole
    surgery to partially remove my right Fallopian tube and my baby. I am
    still devastated and have recently returned to full time teaching after
    being very depressed. AF arrived today so I am a hormonal and emotional
    wreck! We will be TTC again this cycle so I am excited but terrified of
    losing another baby.
    When we successfully have a baby I am intending to leave teaching and
    become a childminder. I initially trained as a nursery nurse, did a
    Psychology degree, PGCE and a Master of Arts in Education (of which I am
    most proud!) I know I am over qualified for this role but I think I
    will love it. I adore babies although I am very sad around them at the
    moment.
    I am a little concerned that I will want further challenge so am considering:
    • a child study on my own infant and perhaps on the children I
      would be childminding (pending parental permission, of course). I am
      unsure whether I could receive funding for a doctorate for this as I
      certainly can't afford tuition fees.
    • running groups for childminders and other Mums from my home based on
      my nursery experience: singalong groups, baby signing, storying or
      similar...
    • providing training for nannies and childminders.
    Do these ideas sound plausible? I need to chat to childminders who
    look after children at my children's centre to find out more. I have
    emailed the National Childminding Association as well. I would be
    interested to hear the thoughts of any teachers, CMs or Mums and wonder if anyone else
    has made this career change? Or whether you have a childminder and would
    value this type of experience over a standard childminding
    qualification?
    Many thanks!




     
  2. I am an excessively broody nursery teacher. My husband and I lost our
    first baby in November. It was an ectopic pregnancy and I had keyhole
    surgery to partially remove my right Fallopian tube and my baby. I am
    still devastated and have recently returned to full time teaching after
    being very depressed. AF arrived today so I am a hormonal and emotional
    wreck! We will be TTC again this cycle so I am excited but terrified of
    losing another baby.
    When we successfully have a baby I am intending to leave teaching and
    become a childminder. I initially trained as a nursery nurse, did a
    Psychology degree, PGCE and a Master of Arts in Education (of which I am
    most proud!) I know I am over qualified for this role but I think I
    will love it. I adore babies although I am very sad around them at the
    moment.
    I am a little concerned that I will want further challenge so am considering:
    • a child study on my own infant and perhaps on the children I
      would be childminding (pending parental permission, of course). I am
      unsure whether I could receive funding for a doctorate for this as I
      certainly can't afford tuition fees.
    • running groups for childminders and other Mums from my home based on
      my nursery experience: singalong groups, baby signing, storying or
      similar...
    • providing training for nannies and childminders.
    Do these ideas sound plausible? I need to chat to childminders who
    look after children at my children's centre to find out more. I have
    emailed the National Childminding Association as well. I would be
    interested to hear the thoughts of any teachers, CMs or Mums and wonder if anyone else
    has made this career change? Or whether you have a childminder and would
    value this type of experience over a standard childminding
    qualification?
    Many thanks!




     
  3. May I start by saying I'm sorry about your loss. And the lack of paragraphs. For some reason it wont allow me to post with paragraphs from my phone.
    I've been a childminder for 7 years, chair a nursery school governing body, mentor newly registered minders for our
    local authority, take CCLD student placements from our local college, and chair our regions NCMA volunteers
    committee. I've also just completed my foundation degree.
    I've recently cut down my minding hours to work as a part time TA with an autistic child in KS1. Working for the LEA is like a holiday compared to being self employed. childminders can easily work 60 child facing hours each week without taking paperwork and CPD into account. I take only 2 weeks holiday each year plus bank hols as my business is based around my availability. I also work through sickness where I can as I can't afford to loose the income. Taking a week off with flu hit our finances hard.
    Most minders (those with Ofsted Good or Outstanding) have found that their child development records are far more in depth than nurseries produce, but along with all our policies, procedures, risk assessments, attendance records, accounts, planning, newsletters, new starter packs, web sites and advertising, should be done outside of Childminding hours.
    You'll notice I've found plenty of ways to use my early years skills and keep myself sharp but non of them interfere with the care I've offered to children. As much as I would have liked to run a group from home, working alone makes this such a non starter. Risk assessments to start, plus if you need the loo, or nip out of the room to answer the door,you can't leave your mindees with unregistered people. Actually, you shouldn't even leave them with other
    registered people without getting specific parental consent!
    Another issue with working alone is that you get no breaks at all. As a governor I have no sympathy at all for teachers who complain they don't get enough ppa time! Do it at 10pm like the rest of us i say! ;-) Having said that, I love being
    self employed. It's great knowing that you don't need to answer to anyone (except parents, ofsted, local authority, FSA, HMRC, DoE, Childminding network coordinator...)

    I love childminding but presently the burocracy and paperwork demands are enormous. Hope this insight helps.
     

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