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Career advice: Using my resources

Discussion in 'English' started by Nellywinner, Dec 21, 2011.

  1. Nellywinner

    Nellywinner New commenter

    I have been teaching English for a number of years now and have always focused on the quality of my own resources (PowerPoint, worksheets etc.) I believe (and have been told) that a certain resource template I am currently working on is different, innovative and would be of interest to all departments in a school, reinventing the way that SOW are presented and delivered. Has anyone got any advice for me as to how I should go about trying to break into this area (resource making) of our profession? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Nellywinner

    Nellywinner New commenter

    I have been teaching English for a number of years now and have always focused on the quality of my own resources (PowerPoint, worksheets etc.) I believe (and have been told) that a certain resource template I am currently working on is different, innovative and would be of interest to all departments in a school, reinventing the way that SOW are presented and delivered. Has anyone got any advice for me as to how I should go about trying to break into this area (resource making) of our profession? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
  3. Nellywinner

    Nellywinner New commenter

    Just searched for anyone who has had a similar issue and found a link http://community.tes.co.uk/forums/p/519921/7010391.aspx#7010391
    If anyone still has any advice, please share :)
     
  4. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    Have you tried Teachit?
     
  5. I'm pretty sure there's something in most contracts that specifies whatever resources you create while working for your employer belong to your employer...you might want to check that out.
     
  6. Try contacting Richard Gent on this forum or check out http://www.englishedu.co.uk and he'll show you how to broadcast you wares.

    If you write the material in your own time, it is yours to disseminate as you wish.
     
  7. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    As long as you don't do it on a school computer.
     
  8. Never bothered me. If I have any pedantic checkers in the wings wanting to chase me for this, they are welcome. What they would suddenly find in return is a huge hole in their resources site when I wipe what I have made freely available there. ;-)
     
  9. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    I worked for such a monumental %$&*$%$ that I knew he would... so I did NOTHING on my school machine apart from the register.
    Ah, yes. The VLE suddenly emptied itself... wonder how that happened :)
     
  10. Sleepyhead...just seen this! A new one on me. Saw it and thought of your recent comment.

    Noah Kravitz, a California-based blogger, is being sued by his former employer, PhoneDog, which is seeking damages because he failed to relinquish his Twitter account when he left the company to work for a rival.
    PhoneDog said that it had invested in growing the number of followers that Mr Kravitz had on Twitter and the account to be its property. The company told the New York Times: "We intend to aggressively protect our customer lists and confidential information, intellectual property, trademark and brands."
    Though disputes over company Twitter accounts are relatively new - and British law is of course different from American law - this case is not without precedent. Earlier this year, the BBC's chief political correspondent Laura Kuenssberg moved from the BBC to ITV and took her Twitter account - and its 58,000 followers - with her. The BBC did not seek legal ownership of her account.
    The question of social media account ownership has even reached British courts. In 2008, a British recruitment consultant, Mark Ions, was ordered to hand over his LinkedIn account to his former employer, Hays. A court ruled that Mr Ions contacts constituted confidential information gathered during his work for Hays and therefore the former employer had a right to access the account.
    It's less likely, under British law at least, that an employer would be able to claim ownership of a Twitter or Facebook account belonging to an employee or former employer.
     

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