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Can I teach in FE with a BA (hons) primary education with qts degree?

Discussion in 'Further Education' started by lauren8811, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. You need more than a teaching degree or be a mother to teach childcare - in most establishments. What you lack is long-term experience and/or an NVQ3.
    Either, seek out courses where you can gain an NVQ3, or look at other options.
    What springs to mind is the Foundation departments/ Learner Support bases. Your degree might come in very useful to those moving from P scales to KS, or still working at KS2, even though they are over 16.
     
  2. I've not said that anywhere.
    Not decrying the importance of history A levels, but they are not really what FE is about.
    Why?
    Apparently you can teach childcare with an (uncompleted) primary
    teaching qualification and a bit of work experience. Why not teach
    plumbing with a DIY adult course behind you and a few trips to B&Q.
    I'd rather you didn't, far too boring

     
  3. Uncompleted? How is my degree uncomplete? I am still a qualified teacher whether I complete my nqt year or not
     
  4. Andy_91

    Andy_91 New commenter

    Lauren8811.

    Until fairly recently I ran childcare provision with a college with around 350 NVQ students, 2 FD cohorts, 2 L3 FT courses, 2 L2 FT courses and 1 at L1.

    If you had applied for a job there, we would have interviewed you, which is all you need to know.

    If you approached us and we had no vacancies, we would have kept you on the books for sessional work. Some of my PT tutors who own their own establishments would have arranged some placements for you, if it was warranted/useful.

    Ignore teachered. Nothing ventured etc...
     
  5. Indeed, ignore me. Listen to the bloke who would employ someone who hasn't completed their NQT year and would use someone with limited experience in a sessional teaching role. Everything that is wrong with FE. With a bit of luck you will help him push out a seasoned, experienced teacher who has got a bit expensive.
     
  6. Not so. You cannot teach unsupervised in a school and I would be reluctant to employ someone in FE who had not met the minimum requirements for QTS.
     
  7. Andy_91

    Andy_91 New commenter

    Yes. Ignore him. He doesn't hire and fire. I did.

    He also conveniently misses the bit where an experienced practitioner would have willingly helped with placements if there was a need.

    I think his last remark tells you all you need to know about his professionalism and who you should listen to.
     
  8. Thanks andy_91 I appreciate your reply.

    and teachered can I ask what your experience is in education as I would prefer to take advice from someone who knows what there talking about who actually works in fe.

    I dont think we are ever going to agree but I think you will find that I can teach unsupervised and I have met all the requirements for qts as I already have qts..i dont think you quite understand how a primary education degree works...
     
  9. Did, does and do, significantly more than you have or will. And I would not employ someone who had not completed their training as a teacher and who had limited experience of the area they are teaching.
     
  10. I am an engineer (mechanical) by first profession and I moved into teaching (FE) over 25 years ago after a successful career which included a number of innovative mecheng projects. I spent the first half of my career teaching in and then running one of the UK's largest and best regarded engineering departments, combining both public and military engineering. My department comprised some 4,500 students and 100 teaching, support and ancillary staff. I moved away from this (though continued, as I do today, to teach engineering) to become part of the college's senior leadership team. My area of responsibility was the entirety of the colleges vocational provision (85% of its work with 20,000 students), its adult education programme and its growing apprenticeship programme.

    I was thought of as 'principal material' and trundled off to do my CEL leadership training, only for it to unearth in me a passion for teaching that outweighs any aspiration to be a principal, which I believe to be a thankless role too far removed from the reality of the job. I used this reinvigoration of my passion for teaching to do a second honours degree in education, followed by a masters degree. I am part-way through a doctorate I doubt I will ever finish. Whilst studying for my masters degree some ten years ago or so, I was asked to teach part-time on the university's FE ITT programme and for some years balanced teaching in FE with teaching in HE, though my focus has been and always will be FE. For the last five years I have led one of the largest FE ITT university departments in the country.
    You do not have QTS if you have not finished your NQT year (I still, by habit, call it a 'year'), I understand fully how schools ITT works. You have a QTS-bearing degree, which recommends you to the (one time GTC) Teaching Agency as a qualified teacher. Unless you are covered by any of the exemptions in Annex B of the statutory guidance, you are required to have a period of supervised induction before your QTS is confirmed. As this government replaced the QTS standards for generic 'Teachers' Standards' in September 2012, the term QTS has been airbrushed from the schools policy lexicon.
    Enough for you?
     
  11. Reported, along with the personal abusive direct message to me, which is a new and disturbing development. Maybe someone will take action against you at some point.
     
  12. moonpenny

    moonpenny Occasional commenter

    Impressive if a little grumpy, teachered.

    Thinking about the level one students we have who are a mixture of behavioural and learning needs, what they need is a teacher who can provide structure, who is good at relating to the group, ironing out their disagreements, difficulties and traumas, who is good at presenting the students with the basic concepts they need to know, good at working with varying levels of academic ability....we have ASD students who can be very bright.

    They need someone who can support them in organisation, in developing practical skills at a basic level, which can be linked to improving their own social skills.Someone who will encourage them, discipline them and help them look forward to what they do next so maybe getting career support from the college. These are often quite vulnerable and sometimes, difficult to handle.

    A different kettle of fish to what is needed on an engineering degree in FE/HE.

    By working in a support role, Lauren will no doubt be used to handling different types of students.She has nursery experience, she has a degree in a relevant subject.

    As Andy says, the college may ask her to do further placements herself alongside teaching a few hours.Really that is for the department to decide.They may say no but they may be interested.
     
  13. moonpenny

    moonpenny Occasional commenter

    http://jcp.jobhits.co.uk/Level-1-Assessor-Tutor-Childcare-id-589196
    A job like this for example.
     
  14. This is wrong and I have looked at the NQT FAQs page on this website which says:

    Do you lose QTS if you don?t pass induction?
    No, you can never lose your QTS. You have it forever!

    https://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6010772

    This says that you have QTS even if you FAIL your NQT year so I think you will find that everyone is awarded QTS as soon as they complete there degree whether you do your NQT year or not.
     
  15. And I feel sorry for anyone who works alongside you teachered if you speak to people the way you do. Ot baffles me how you managed to be part of the senior management team with an attitude like that?
     
  16. My point exactly - he does a LOT of damage as a teacherherder.

    Personal and Abusive - what of you?

     
  17. Can I respectfully ask that you desist from the name calling please Beans, it's hardly appropriate.
     
  18. Lauren, go and try teach in a school without completing your induction year then, I'll think you will see the value of having a QTS bearing award (which you have) without completing teacher training (which you haven't). We can argue semantics, it doesn't change the fact that you are not a fully formed teacher.
     
  19. An attitude like what? You asked for opinions. You don't agree with mine because it doesn't suit your terms of reference. I don't think I have treated you in any way which comes across as rude. If you post asking for opinions, you will not like some of the responses.
     
  20. Yes, my name is Beans.
    No name calling - only clarifying the profession that you yourself have chosen to use for your name.
    <h3>teach A person who shows or explains to (someone) how to do something</h3><h3>herd&middot;er -A person who looks after a herd. Teacherherder - a person who shows or explains to a herd he looks after.</h3> But you could do it generously, wisely, empathetically instead of whipping people about with your evil tongue. No one is picking on you at all...you bring this on yourself.
    And you anger me, by not taking your responsibilities in teacher ed and as a manager of staff, seriously as you might.
    Yes, my name is Beans and I am proud of it.

     

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