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Can I refuse to move to a year group?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by laminator-happy!, Nov 27, 2010.

  1. I have been asked, due a restructure of the staffing, from next sept to move to a year group I don't feel I would be best suited to.
    Can I say no? I have been told by SLT that I'm employed to work in a primary school and that means any year.
    What do you think? Should I stand my ground as I feel uncomfortable for many reasons or should I just shut up and get on with it? I know next sept is a very long way off but the Head is trying to get the structure right as we have big changes coming.
    Any thoughts very welcome.

     
  2. I have been asked, due a restructure of the staffing, from next sept to move to a year group I don't feel I would be best suited to.
    Can I say no? I have been told by SLT that I'm employed to work in a primary school and that means any year.
    What do you think? Should I stand my ground as I feel uncomfortable for many reasons or should I just shut up and get on with it? I know next sept is a very long way off but the Head is trying to get the structure right as we have big changes coming.
    Any thoughts very welcome.

     
  3. Why do you think you wouldn't be best suited to that year group? Have you worked in that year group before? Wouldn't a move just get you more experience of all year groups, and therefore make you even better than you no doubtedly are?
    As far as I am aware (and I could be wrong,) your school are right. You work in a primary school, and they can put you with any year group.
    However, if it was a big move, say from Y5 to Y1, as your headteacher, I would think very carefully about moving you and consider all of my options.
     
  4. At least they have given you plenty of notice, and are trying to sort this out quickly.
     
  5. In answer to your question, no you can't refuse to move. Your SLT are correct, when you are employed as a 'Teacher' they can deploy you anywhere they like. If it is a massive move then they may consider your case, however at least they told you early. You've now got the rest of this year to liase with the current teacher of that year group and find things out either that or you could look for a job elsewhere.
     
  6. I've gone from R/1 through 2/3 and now 5/6. each time I thought it was "wrong" for me, each time I've loved it!
    Treat it as an opportunity rather than an obstacle. At the end of the day, if the Head says you are going then you are, so you need to make the most of it!
     
  7. Thanks all. I thought this was the case but needed outside voices to confirm it for me.
    It isn't a massive move but to a difficult year group where I have some experience but not vast, also working with a very tricky teacher who I have little respect for.
    I have got all year to do something about it and yes that may include looking elsewhere as I don't want to be unhappy in a job I love.


     
  8. You also have plenty of time to hand your notice in if you really don't like it...
     
  9. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    Heads don't tend to move people around to annoy or test them, it's generally because they believe that the move is the best thing for the children and the school. Your own needs and desires are secondary to reasonable, professional expecations of you. I'm fairly sure that your head believes you are entirely suited to that year group and class.
    You are employed as a professional to provide the best possible education for the children your services are allocated to.
    To dig your heels in and 'refuse' to teach a class just because you don't fancy it is a little childish and unprofessional, and on that basis, moving schools might be the best thing for the school as well as you.
    Or you could simply see it as a positive challenge and get on with it. In my experience, most people who are unhappy about such a change often find they quite like it after a short while.

     
  10. paulie86

    paulie86 New commenter

    I can completely understand your concerns OP. I am a soon to be ex-middle school teacher. I trained in middle schools 4 years ago and have worked in one since I qualified. I have therefore only ever taught 9-13. I am terrified of going into a primary school and being askead to teach Key Stage 1. On a 'taster' day recently I found Year 3 scary! I think I would make the best of it, but I hope as others have said the head will know the right place for their staff and will make the right decisions.
     
  11. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Not to mention being grounds for the institution of disciplinary procedures.
     
  12. I think paulie's case is completely different, having trained and only worked in middle schools, any other key stage must seem very daunting, I would have the same response if asked to teach post primary-yr 7's might be Ok but after that they are far too big and scary for me! However the OP presumably trained in primary and must have had experience of and training in at the very least two of the three stages-my primary training stretched from Nursery to yr 6. Unless the Head is asking a yr 6 teacher to go straight to Reception without forwarning or a handover, ( which hardly seems to be the case) there seems little grounds for complaint.
     
  13. Very true Jackie. The Head is hopefully thinking of the strategic overview of the school. As others have said, sometimes you have to do things that you don't fancy yourself but see it as an opportunity to learn about a different area of the school.
     
  14. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    Out of interest, which do you consider to be the 'easy' year groups?
     
  15. I'd read it as 'a year group containing particularly challenging characters' rather than the age - but we all have to deal with challenging children.
    The bit that is perhaps more worrying for the OP is the difficult colleague - if it is someone that you really don't think you'll be able to get on with, maybe looking for a new job is the best option. In theory, we should be able to get on with others - in practice, a difficult colleague can make life very miserable indeed, especially if SMT thinks the colleague is wonderful.
    So, is it the year-group that is the real issue? Maybe not.
     
  16. Thank you so much for all your views. The year group is difficult due to the children, many, many difficult and different problems, while that would not concern me under normal circumstances, the situation the school is in, is far from normal.

    Yes I am very worried about working with the other teacher ........
    But I will go and do the best job I can because I love the school and feel very happy there, it is not time for me to move on yet.

    Thanks all
     
  17. I think your school is correct and you are there to teach. I also had only taught 9 - 13 year olds for 11 years in a middle school, doing a specialist subject with a bit of Maths and Literacy on the side. When I married, I had to move and my new county only has primary schools. Spent about 4 years doing supply in various primaries in that county and I was pleasantly surprised how some things are the same no matter where you teach. I then spent 6 years teaching Reception, then moved straight up to Y6 where I taught for many years. If you are up for the challenge, it's good training and experience - you can see where children have come from and where they need to get to.I had the experience of 'starting' a group of children off in Reception and then 'finishing' that same class off in Y6 - it was lovely to see what progress they had made.
     
  18. I would welcome the change with open arms. I have taught the same year levels of the same subjects now for the last 5 years. Whilst I am good at what I do with these classes it would be nice to teach something different. I am qualified to teach quiet a few different subjects but have to accept the classes the timetabling deputy gives me. It has finally gotten to the stage where I need the change as I feel that doing the same classes for too long can make teaching a bit dry and stale. So open your arms and embrace the opportunity to do something different. Talk with the other teacher about your concerns you may be surprised.
    Cheers
     
  19. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter


    You seem to have been given a lot of notice so at least you have the opportunity to move if you want to. We don't usually find out what year group we will be in until July so it is too late to hand in our notice for the new year.
     
  20. Have you thought that it is a compliment to you that your head feels you are able to deal with both challenging children and a challenging member of staff? The fact that your head has let you know so far in advance has given you time to consider strategies to deal with both. A number of time in my career (now retired) I was placed with a senior member of staff many found difficult to cope with but we developed a mutual respect and friendship that lasted until we both retired and beyond that. Don't despair be proactive your head obviously feels you are the most able member of staff for the job.
     

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