1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

can demonstrations be good or outstanding?

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by judomum, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. Being observed next week and I dont want to have to change the sequence of lessons I've planned for the next few weeks. Mainly due to the fact that my GCSE food group only get one double per fortnight.
    So during my next lesson I had planned to introduce / recap different pastry types, functions of ingredients etc and dem. flaky or rough puff. (They have made shortcrust and choux in yr9)
    I'm concerned now about the whole "showing progress" issue in 20 mins. I don't often demonstrate to yr 10 as my current students are a really keen bunch with good skills but I felt this was a necessary one as its a completely new skill.
    Can anyone reassure me or suggest a different approach to it or would you just avoid doing dem.s when observed?
     
  2. Being observed next week and I dont want to have to change the sequence of lessons I've planned for the next few weeks. Mainly due to the fact that my GCSE food group only get one double per fortnight.
    So during my next lesson I had planned to introduce / recap different pastry types, functions of ingredients etc and dem. flaky or rough puff. (They have made shortcrust and choux in yr9)
    I'm concerned now about the whole "showing progress" issue in 20 mins. I don't often demonstrate to yr 10 as my current students are a really keen bunch with good skills but I felt this was a necessary one as its a completely new skill.
    Can anyone reassure me or suggest a different approach to it or would you just avoid doing dem.s when observed?
     
  3. What are you more concerned with, getting an 'outstanding' or teaching the kids? Just my opinion, but you should show all the planning to the observer and show how this fits into the the scheme you are currently teaching. If it is deamed to be a 'satisfactory' lesson (or 'adequate' which is the new terminology), then be pleased that you have taught the kids properly and not compromised simply to please the inspectors.
     
  4. SDL

    SDL

    Hi,
    Just had a lesson observation myself and deemed to be satisfactory - a bit disappointed to say the least when all previous observations have either been good or outstanding.
    I was fortunate enough to speak to our teaching and learning consultant about this who pointed me in the right direction.
    Over the years Ofsted lesson criteria has changed which means that a lesson I taught 5 to 10 years ago may have been deemed good or outstanding. Having taught the same structured lesson recently I am now satisfactory. Here is where the change lies;
    Demos are a great way of showing students concepts, ideas and how things are supposed to work. What Ofsted are looking for now is hands on activity where students are given the opportunity to become involved in enquiry based learning or independent learning which for us practical teachers means letting the *** have a go and allowing them to work some things out for themselves - even if this means them getting things wrong or the food room ending up in a complete mess.
    I am not a food teacher but a Resistant Materials teacher. Here's the advice given to me by our Teaching and Learning consultant;
    Place an item on the bench which you have made, provide the same tools and materials you have used for the item you made on each students work station. The task is then to get the students to recreate what you have made. Show them the artefact to start with and get them to answer questions such as, how do you think this was made, what did I need to do to make it fit together, could I have done it another way, what tools did I use, why do you think I used those specific tools? The key is to get them thinking about what to do as opposed to giving them all of the information to do it. Hey, if they get it wrong, so what, they learn by their mistakes and move on.
    If you can apapt your lesson in Food around this model you should cover the independent learning and enquiry based learning. Whilst they're having a go, speak to some individually about how they're getting on. A Plenary does not have to be for the whole class at the end of the lesson - it can be an individual activity aimed at one student part way through alesson. After all a plenary serves to reinforce the learning which has taken place during the lesson, there is no written rule when it can be done and by how many students.
    Hope this helps. Let us know how you get on.
     
  5. Can you do it and get them to make their own ready to freeze for another session so it isn't just a dem? When we do rough puff, I do a mini dem with the quick rubbing in, then they do that I do another mini dem putting in the folds and leave it there to freeze. I then give a dem on shapes that it can be made into and finishing techniques.( you could also have some alraedy prepared so they could practice finishing techniques)
    Starter -Show them a finished piece of finished rough puff and ask them at start to or note down what are the RA's ? and Functions of the ingredinets + how they work.
    And throughout the practical they usually identify steam as a RA, as well as air.
    I would stick to your plan, perhaps make it more interactive and prove "progress" throughout by questioning at start and review their answers throughout or at end.
    You could do a comparison with ready made predicting which is cheaper, convenience quality of outcomes and so on.
    Good luck.
     
  6. Oh dear, this sounds like National Curriculum, first version has come back around, don't teach them anything, but open the room up and let them find out for themselves.

    I am doing a practical, skills based project with a group this week. We've done the drawing and basic prep. I will demonstrate how to make the artifact before the students embark on the task. If I am observed in that lesson (not likely as we are not up for observations at the moment), I will be happy that I've taught the students what to do and given them the chance to show their skills by making the artifact. I will also be happy with the satisfactory that any inspector would give me.

    32 years teaching, maybe it's time to go!!!
     
  7. Sure does, anyway, taught my thoroughly satisfactory (adequate) lesson today and I'm very pleased with the progress made.
     
  8. SDL

    SDL

    Excellent!
     
  9. thistledoo

    thistledoo Senior commenter

    Having similar dilemma at our school. Only we are in SM and have to improve lessons to good or outstanding. So, where we can we are splitting lessons and recipes encouraging students to design with a variety of ingredients, the emphasis on what the students design could be improving nutrients such as Vitamin C. We then complete the dish in the next lesson. I have just organised a Y7 crumble lesson in this way with a range of ingredients for students to make the crumble with.
    Another idea is to do 'spot-dems' but let the students do them, you could target the higher level students do this and reflect it in your lesson plan, identifying the students and the levels who will be asked to demonstrate. I have found out today that the inspectors are looking for the use of data to plan and inform the lesson, so, identify students of different levels and ask higher level questions specifically targeting them. Use the level descriptors in your questions... ask students to describe or explain why they have chosen ingredients...levels 4 & 5. We are being encouraged to do a room plan where students work and name and label the levels of the students that we give to the inspectors.
    I have to do this... and will let you know how I get on... it reminds me of when D&T was introduced in Food and an inspector told me that some skills have to come last (he meant keeping tidy and organised) student progress was all that mattered. My lesson was deemed 'excellent' but it took me all day to sort and clear the mess. (Showing how old I am!!)
    We are also ensuring the appropriate level descriptors are added to all task sheets and we constantly refer to them.
    I did a demonstration recently, by the way, but planned the questioning to specific students and included everything I could think of - links to history, current money issues & choice of food, nutrients linked to teenage health problems, prior knowledge and lessons etc., etc., I also had different students come to the front and complete my demonstration bits 'n' pieces.Students completed levelled task sheet... I got a good with outstanding features.
    Another idea, is to give students cards labelled with hygiene, quality control or safety and they hold up the cards as they recognise which you are demonstrating. Always include some 'student doing' task/ targeted questioning in your demonstration.

    Any other ideas... please let me know, particularly for 1 hour lessons!!
     
  10. thistledoo

    thistledoo Senior commenter

    And I forgot to say... Yes, it certainly does feel like the first round of D&T all over again, remyk69! And I still don't have a technician. On a serious note, all that matters are the students and getting our school out of SM, so far, so good but it is really, really tiring and hard work just doesn't describe it!
     
  11. this is just the advice I have been looking for - thank you so much!
     

Share This Page