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Can anyone offer any pointers?

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by daniju, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. I am getting towards the end of a GTP course and along with many of the posts on here, have decided that secondary school teaching is just not for me. I have worked in other jobs before this, have a degree and a masters, but can honestly say I have never worked this hard in terms of the hours.
    Whilst I understand that as a trainee we have to put in the time, I was not prepared for working every single weekend, and most evenings until late. But what is worse is when I hear trained teachers talking about how they try to finish by 8pm, or don't ALWAYS take marking on holiday with them.
    These are people maybe 10 years in teaching, and yet it still dominates their life. There are always exceptions to the rule, but as with anything, the more workaholics that come along, the more that becomes the expectation for everyone.
    Then there is the constant need for self-improvement. Of course nobody should be complacent but to leave every single lesson thinking 'what could I have done better' is just not healthy for self-esteem!
    Sorry for the rant but I am tired and utterly fed up!!
    My real question is to ask people what other areas connected with education that they have found work in. Lots of the posts here talk vaguely about adult education, museums, langauge colleges etc, and I am very interested in working in anything in those fields, but I need a regular decent income, as opposed to occasional work and just don't know where to look.
    The problem is who to ask.
    My mentor is also head of department, so at this stage the last thing I want to do is sabotage a possible job next year by confiding in him. I have worked extensively in behaviour and SEN and would love to work in this area again on better pay, but again, do not want to make this known to the school and SENCO etc, to risk shooting myself in the foot.
    Right now I need a job come september, having a family to support, and so am going through the motions of 'loving' teaching, but really do not want to go through another year like this as an NQT.
    On the other hand I like working with kids and have years of experience so do not want to throw it away by ending up in a call centre out of desperation.
    Some people on these posts get quite defensive and angry about teachers having second thoughts, and to those people I can only apologise and say that I am not taking teaching for granted, and that none of this was planned.
    If I cannot find another job I will of course work like crazy and give it my all to do a good job as a teacher, but my heart is just not in it and life is just too short.
    Any career suggestions would be really appreciated.
     
  2. I am getting towards the end of a GTP course and along with many of the posts on here, have decided that secondary school teaching is just not for me. I have worked in other jobs before this, have a degree and a masters, but can honestly say I have never worked this hard in terms of the hours.
    Whilst I understand that as a trainee we have to put in the time, I was not prepared for working every single weekend, and most evenings until late. But what is worse is when I hear trained teachers talking about how they try to finish by 8pm, or don't ALWAYS take marking on holiday with them.
    These are people maybe 10 years in teaching, and yet it still dominates their life. There are always exceptions to the rule, but as with anything, the more workaholics that come along, the more that becomes the expectation for everyone.
    Then there is the constant need for self-improvement. Of course nobody should be complacent but to leave every single lesson thinking 'what could I have done better' is just not healthy for self-esteem!
    Sorry for the rant but I am tired and utterly fed up!!
    My real question is to ask people what other areas connected with education that they have found work in. Lots of the posts here talk vaguely about adult education, museums, langauge colleges etc, and I am very interested in working in anything in those fields, but I need a regular decent income, as opposed to occasional work and just don't know where to look.
    The problem is who to ask.
    My mentor is also head of department, so at this stage the last thing I want to do is sabotage a possible job next year by confiding in him. I have worked extensively in behaviour and SEN and would love to work in this area again on better pay, but again, do not want to make this known to the school and SENCO etc, to risk shooting myself in the foot.
    Right now I need a job come september, having a family to support, and so am going through the motions of 'loving' teaching, but really do not want to go through another year like this as an NQT.
    On the other hand I like working with kids and have years of experience so do not want to throw it away by ending up in a call centre out of desperation.
    Some people on these posts get quite defensive and angry about teachers having second thoughts, and to those people I can only apologise and say that I am not taking teaching for granted, and that none of this was planned.
    If I cannot find another job I will of course work like crazy and give it my all to do a good job as a teacher, but my heart is just not in it and life is just too short.
    Any career suggestions would be really appreciated.
     
  3. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    Ex teachers crop up everywhere. There are actually more people with teaching qualifications not teaching than all the teachers currently employed in England. If you are a musician you could be the next Sting or an actor the next Dawn French or Jennifer Saunders DJ- Chris Tarrant. More mundanely I know many who have gone into: outdoor pursuits, ski holidays,museum work,tourist guide, insurance, journalism, local politics oh and lapdancing!. If you are still keen on working with children then there is social care, educational welfare and nurseries.
    You need to think about using your degree both the subject and the level to train and you may find that your university careers service offers alumni support. You should talk with professional advisers.The website prospects.ac.uk has some useful guides and information.
    You do need to also be realistic the graduate job market has been hit by the current recession and many public sector posts have vanished as a result.
     
  4. How about corporate training, in whatever field you previously worked? For example, if you were a software engineer, you could look at becoming an IT trainer.
     
  5. susiejay

    susiejay Administrator

    Teaching assistant?
     
  6. Hello daniju.

    I agree with everything you have said! I am in the same position now, qualifying from a 4year honours degree. People are getting jobs on our course now and I know I don't really want to teach for the same reasons you have mentioned.

    It seems as though to be a teacher these days you have to put 70% of yourself into school work and so your family, social life and leisure time are left to battle out the remaining 30% of your time.

    As my course is specific/vocational I have also found that there is no support if you have a change of heart. It is nice to have someone on the same page and not saying 'you're crazy... what a waste'. I have been on four teaching placements now - totalling 32 weeks and feel that the spark has gone out.
    As for anyone that criticises - you have to try things to realise that they are not for you. We initially wanted to teach and so we trained to do that? People do change.

    The only thing I could suggest is seeing the careers advisor at your university.
     
  7. Notwithstanding

    Notwithstanding New commenter

    It would be helpful to post what your degree and masters are in, and what your other jobs were?

    But you will find teachers in as many non-teaching jobs as exist. Simply play to your strengths. I've gone self employed back in the construction industry. Yes it's uncertain times but there is no *** in Whitehall like Gove in charge of the very way I work.

    I'd sooner be spending day and night pouring my time into my own business, which does pay off, than the thankless society with few-and-far-between fleeting good moments that teaching has become.
     
  8. Thanks to everyone for the helpful advice.
    To Notwithstanding:
    My degree and masters are in english, (training in history) and I am experienced in behaviour management and pastoral care in secondary education. I would love a SENCO or inclusion role, but one of the reasons I moved into teaching was because I had hit the pay ceiling on TA levels and lots of jobs I was applying for needed a teaching qualification, even if it was not actually a teaching role.
    They are the kind of options I can think of in schools, but I would also love to work in museums, education units etc, or adult education/ language teaching. The important thing is that I have a regular income to provide for my family. Hope that helps?
    Thanks again for the kind words and any help you can offer.
     
  9. Hello,
    Sorry to hear you are not enjoying teaching. If it's museums you are interested in, then you will generally be looked on as a really good candidate for an education post - although pay is probably less than teaching depending on where you are based! It is also very competitive, with volunteering in museums/galleries etc, MA in Museum Studies all often 'essential' criteria. However, you sound like a really strong candidate for this work if it's what you're interested in. GEM (Group for Education in Museums) has a good jobs list as does Leicester University Museums Jobs Desk (not so specialised but good range of jobs) which will give you an idea of job specs, pay and experience expected. There are currently a lot of part time contracts around and also often museum jobs are funding led so short term/temporary contracts are common.
    You could also contact an education officer at your local museum and have a chat with them about what they do/see if it's for you. We are generally all lovely, helpful people!
    Good luck :)
     
  10. As a PGCE trainee I always value talking to people with teaching qualifications who work for agencies, publishers, museums and all the companies who work in education because they have a better understanding about what teachers need. If you aren't sure you can do a bit of supply work for a term or two and then if you want to stay in teaching try and find a school to support you. Money and time permitting of course.
     
  11. I suggest that, so long as life is not completely terrible and you are offered a position, you complete the NQT year and then decide. It is a hard year but once it is over you are fully qualified and can quickly look into ALL areas of education rather than the selection now open to you. Most people on my course are not looking at staying as a classroom teacher for more than a few years. One is doing the NQT bit over 18months with part-time hours so she can look after her family at the same time. Hope things work out for you; having come this far, I am glad you are looking at finishing ITT at least.
     

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