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Can any one help please?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Alextrain, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. Alextrain

    Alextrain New commenter

    Hi, does anyone have a copy of the Channel 4/Yorkshire TV programme series Britons at War: primary history:7-11 olds that I could borrow please??? In particular I'm interested in the first episode 'The road to war'. I thought I found a copy on Amazon but it is something different. I'm happy to pay postage and will return after Easter. Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Can't help directly, however on this site
    http://www.broadcastforschools.co.uk/site/How_We_Used_to_Live
    it appears the 'first' episode is not entitled 'The Road to War'. Or in fact any of the episodes, so perhaps the title is slightly different to hat you remember?

    No longer updated but there may still be resources here http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primar...rowing_up_in_wartime/teachers_resources.shtml.

    As 'technically' anything post 1066 is no longer covered in Primary, unless done as a local study you may find this article interesting.
    It says
    It is possible to retain a study of World War II in Key Stage II provided that the unit of study either links to the locality, or shows how this was a turning point and draws links to knowledge that children have already developed. In this section you will find podcasts, articles and resources to help you plan to teach World War II as a local study or turning point in history.
    site is here https://www.history.org.uk/primary/categories/britain-since-1930

    which may, or may not, be of use.
     
    Stiltskin likes this.
  3. Stiltskin

    Stiltskin Star commenter

    Repeating from other thread

     
  4. zv1e10

    zv1e10 New commenter

    Are you sure? Surely, the following objective means that events beyond 1066 are covered in Primary. The local history objective is separate:
    A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066
    Examples (non-statutory)
     the changing power of monarchs using case studies such as John, Anne and Victoria
     changes in an aspect of social history, such as crime and punishment from the Anglo-Saxons to the present or leisure and entertainment in the 20th Century
     the legacy of Greek or Roman culture (art, architecture or literature) on later periods in British history, including the present day
     a significant turning point in British history, for example, the first railways or the Battle of Britain
     
  5. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Yes, what you have quoted is correct, in that one can cover some aspects of post 1066 History if studied as part of a 'Local Study', but other than that, any History post 1066 is covered at Secondary level.

    The NC KS2 History curriculum
    Hi2/1.1 Pre-Roman Britain
    Hi2/1.2 Roman Britain
    Hi2/1.3 Anglo-Saxons & Scots
    Hi2 /1.4 Anglo-Saxons & Vikings

    Hi2/2.1 Local History
    Hi2/2.2 Extended chronological study
    Hi2/2.3 Ancient Civilizations
    Hi2/2.4 Ancient Greece
    Hi2/2.5 Non-European Study

    I also have this
    Key focuses:
    Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.
    The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain.
    Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots.
    The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England, up to the time of Edward the Confessor.
    A local history study (this will of course vary from school to school.)
    A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066. (E.g. the changing power of monarchs – using case studies such as John, Anne, and Victoria.)
    The achievements of the earliest civilisations, such as Ancient Egypt or Ancient China.
    Ancient Greece, its achievements, and its influence on the western world.
    A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history, such as early Islamic civilisation, or the Mayan civilisation.

    So you'll see, apart from the local history study & the 'aspect of theme in British history that extends pupil's chronological knowledge beyond 1066. everything else is pre 1066.

    Perhaps History teachers at Secondary felt there was too much of a mismatch in the knowledge of pupils moving from Primary and therefore wanted to keep everything consistent?
     
  6. aviewfromtheridge

    aviewfromtheridge New commenter

    We read the following:
    A local history study (this will of course vary from school to school.)
    A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066. (E.g. the changing power of monarchs – using case studies such as John, Anne, and Victoria.)

    as two separate key focus areas of study, therefore we are using the history of the school and area since the coming of the railway as one focus (as they are of the same time period), and the changing role of monarchs as another focus to look at the Tudors and Stuarts. That would tie in with
    Hi2/2.1 Local History
    Hi2/2.2 Extended chronological study
    being separate too.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  7. Alextrain

    Alextrain New commenter

    Thanks for your help and suggestions guys, seems I have inadvertently opened a can of worms. We have linked this to a local study and it follows on from our WW1 project completed with our village.
     
  8. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Seems it would therefore fit into an extension of pupils' chronological knowledge of an aspect of British history.
     

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