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Calling MiddleMarch

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by mychuck, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. mychuck

    mychuck New commenter

    Hi MM,
    Following up from the thread about parents I thought you would love this gem I had yesterday from one of my parents.
    Phone call....
    Parent: " Hello ** won't be in today"
    Me: "Is she poorly?"
    Parent: "Mmmm not exactly"
    Me: "What do you mean?"
    Parent: " She might have an upset tummy. You remember I enquired about volunteering in school?"
    Me: "Yes."
    Parent: " Could I volunteer at break times and lunch times as *** and I could play together. She might feel better if I was on the playground with her."
    Me: "She's not having problems at break times and lunchtimes as far as I'm aware."
    Parent: " No but I miss her and she does get cold at lunchtime. Could she do a job in school at these times and I could help her?"
    Me: "Sorry no we don't allow that and I think needs to make her own friends just like and other child in Reception. I think ** needs to be in school if she's not poorly.
    Parent: " I'll keep her off this morning just in case she's poorly and pop her in after dinner time."

    It's quite sad really. Mum has obviously got a problem but it's the first time I have had a request like this.



     
  2. mychuck

    mychuck New commenter

    Hi MM,
    Following up from the thread about parents I thought you would love this gem I had yesterday from one of my parents.
    Phone call....
    Parent: " Hello ** won't be in today"
    Me: "Is she poorly?"
    Parent: "Mmmm not exactly"
    Me: "What do you mean?"
    Parent: " She might have an upset tummy. You remember I enquired about volunteering in school?"
    Me: "Yes."
    Parent: " Could I volunteer at break times and lunch times as *** and I could play together. She might feel better if I was on the playground with her."
    Me: "She's not having problems at break times and lunchtimes as far as I'm aware."
    Parent: " No but I miss her and she does get cold at lunchtime. Could she do a job in school at these times and I could help her?"
    Me: "Sorry no we don't allow that and I think needs to make her own friends just like and other child in Reception. I think ** needs to be in school if she's not poorly.
    Parent: " I'll keep her off this morning just in case she's poorly and pop her in after dinner time."

    It's quite sad really. Mum has obviously got a problem but it's the first time I have had a request like this.



     
  3. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    S'truth, you couldn't make it up, could you?
    My enjoyment of this story could only be improved if you then told me yours is a secondary school! (I know it's not!)
    How old is child in question, by the way?
     
  4. <font size="2">Parental attachment issues, very sad but really common here. We've had mothers clinging to fences or peering through hedges/bushes at lunch/break either trying to talk to child or spying and interpreting (always as bullying) what's happening...before charging into the office to make complaints and demand protective action. On occasion I've phoned the local CPO to pick up a possible "peeping tom"....To date I've found no answer to the problem other than time!</font>
     
  5. mychuck

    mychuck New commenter

    MM the child is in reception and at the start of the year mum said she felt her daughter was too young to start school. I think in mum's eyes she always will.
    thrupp - we have a parent and toddler group based in our school one morning a week and the sole aim of some of these parents is to monitor their school aged children from the window. Unfortunately the window looks out onto the playground and they gather with their coffee cups and watch their children from the window. No matter how many posters we put up over the windows - they just take them down. Whilst they observe their children at play they analyse every move and interaction looking for evidence of their child being 'bullied' etc. I'm sure Mumsnet most be 'alive' once they've visited school!
     
  6. deep breath taken....[​IMG] mother needs to find a job!
     
  7. That's a swear word in these parts!!!!!!! Mother's here finally get over loss of child during daytime tv hours by breading and producing another cuddle bundle....At this point much watched over child is pushed to one side. Left to children's tv/any DVD on shelf, wandering the estate, etc, etc, etc........Sad but very true!
     
  8. Of course they don't, they buy bread, then BREED!
     
  9. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Yup. she feels she 'kneeds' another child.
     
  10. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    ***kneads***
    Damn, damn, damn.
     
  11. <font size="2">"Kneed by your own petard" as it were!!!!!!!![​IMG]</font>
     

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