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'but they're very bright'

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by mathsteacher1953, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. I think Einstein called it the Theory of Relativity. They may be bright compared to others he/she sees. You are not alone!
     
  2. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    How do we define bright?
     
  3. swampyjo

    swampyjo New commenter

    My thought too. Above average? L8 at end of KS3? But certainly not below average or all we all bright?
     
  4. DM

    DM New commenter

    Bright? Theory of Relativity? I am reminded of this limerick by A.H. Reginald Buller:

    There was a young lady named Bright
    Whose speed was far faster than light
    She started one day
    In a relative way
    And returned on the previous night
     
  5. yep - get that at ks2 as well - especially wrt the seriously badly-behaved ones - and this from a senco who taught one of our brightest and best ever top groups (2 currently at cambridge) - perspective all depends on where you're standing
     
  6. swampyjo

    swampyjo New commenter

    Most SENCos I have met are as rational as the next man ( or woman ). In fact I might get in trouble if I suggested that this was a common theme amongst SENCos...... My wife is one!
     
  7. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    what evidence can they produce? (do i mean empirical?)
     
  8. swampyjo

    swampyjo New commenter

    My wife doesn't need evidence. I am always guilty!
     
  9. Guish

    Guish New commenter

    ^ Hahaha.
     
  10. Guish

    Guish New commenter

    Hahaha
     
  11. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    know that feeling!
     
  12. afterdark

    afterdark Lead commenter

    The long path down the garden of "negativity versus being upbeat" may loom but refuse to engage in this.
    Venting frustrating on here is better than arguing with the Senco but the problem has not really gone away. I suggest that you go in armed with some facts. Printed out may help.Have you ever asked the Senco what they mean by that statement?
    It is germane to the purpose of the meeting "pupil progres" relative to what is expected.
    Level 4 at the end of KS3 is below the majority of children nationally
    https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/eOrderingDownload/QCA-99-457.pdf
    page 20 (18 of 192)
    Below the majority of children nationally is not very bright.
    This document is even shorter and more succint.
    http://www.education.gov.uk/performancetables/ks3_04/k3.shtml
    At which point you can then say to the Senco "As far as his/her mathematics is concerned, it would be most helpful if you could stop asserting that child X is actually quite bright;when the evidence that is accumulating suggests quite the contrary"
    "Helpful in terms of realistic expectations and target setting"
    It is all very well making these "positive" assertions but in meetings it helps to remain factual and dispassionate.
    I recommend having someone else there at the meeting who is in the SMT who can be dispassionate.
    If you already tried this then sorry, but your post does not suggest that this is the case.
    Good Luck.
     
  13. You are forgetting that it is all these pupils' prior teachers that are at fault.
    If they had properly differentiated work at a level personalised to the pupils, it is obvious they would be achieving far above that which is currently being seen.
    SENCO must be right, because you can tell from a few tasks and conversations that pupils are bright.
    Maybe said pupils have nice, fake tans meaning they are quite bright.
    Anyway, what is bright? Is it in relation to another pupil, a class, an entire cohort? In relation to the SENCO themself?
     
  14. afterdark

    afterdark Lead commenter

    I understand the problem, it really does need to be dealt with.
    It often helps to remind people of the fable about "the emporer's new clothes"
     
  15. afterdark

    afterdark Lead commenter

    Yw.
    I left the lunacy of the UK years ago.
    I rememer such nonsense very well. It sounds as though you really do need to force the issue. I found getting someone in from the LEA is often helpful, it is often difficult for the head to coerce someone from without. In fact it could help for the Senco to have a reality adjustment.
    Once you have the extra people in, simple say
    "what do you mean this student is quite bright?"
    "In what sense?"
    It is not fair on anyone to have unreasonable expectations. It is not fair on the parents to be lied to, which is the consequence of such nonsense.
    Ah, is there a bully at work somewhere perhaps?
    It is shame that the UK has reached such Orwellian levels pf censureship. Bright is acceptable but its mirror twin is not. It is bizarre really, because bright is a comparison just the same as dull is. To be bright there must be some other who must, by definition, be less bright. Though it does appear that we have someone less bright as Education Secretary...
    Good luck to you back there in old blighty.
    I don't miss all that ****.
    Anyway, I digest. More Tea for me. [​IMG]
     
  16. swampyjo

    swampyjo New commenter

    Yes.
    I have a wife and two kids to keep fed and watered. In my younger days would have taken the b'ds on. Unfortunately most of my more experienced colleagues who have been at the school some time have either left or been forced out. I cannot afford to be forced out!
    Fortunately the maths results prop up the whole school's results, so am probably safe for now.
     

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