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Brisket

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by scottjw, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. Just picked up a rather large piece of rolled Brisket. I know it needs to be cooked slowly, but does anyone have any particular recipes for Brisket that they would recommend?

    They seem to use Brisket a lot in America on Man vs Food
    Also got a big bag of green tomatoes today, so I will be chutneying that in the next couple of days, ready for the Christmas hamper.
     
  2. Just picked up a rather large piece of rolled Brisket. I know it needs to be cooked slowly, but does anyone have any particular recipes for Brisket that they would recommend?

    They seem to use Brisket a lot in America on Man vs Food
    Also got a big bag of green tomatoes today, so I will be chutneying that in the next couple of days, ready for the Christmas hamper.
     
  3. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    I always do brisket in the slow cooker. If you have one then the recipe I do is something like:
    Brown the brisket in a large frying pan then remove to a plate
    Brown the following veg: carrots, wedges of onion, celery
    Put a layer of veg into the slow cooker. Put the meat on top and wedge any remaining veg round the sides with some fresh thyme and some dried bay leaves.
    Add water to just come a cm or so up the side of the beef.
    Cook for 2 hours on high then 5-6 hours on low.
    When done, remove the meat, cover and stand. Strain the stock from the slow cooker and use to make gravy with butter, flour and a stock cube. It makes the most delicious sweet gravy.
     
  4. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    Did you see my post - Rapeseed oil at Aldi at the moment!
     
  5. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    This is from another thread and works well:

    First thing I'd do though is unroll your brisket. It cooks more evenly in a flat piece; I don't know why most butchers roll it. You could cut it into two equal 450g pieces if you wish to make it easier to fit into your pot (still your biggest one though!). I'd tend to cook it in these large pieces, rather than cut it up further.
    Season a couple of tablespoons of flour with salt and pepper and then dredge your pieces of beef with the seasoned flour. Shake off any excess. In your largest oven and hob proof casserole, heat a tablespoon or two of either vegetable oil or dripping. Then, on a high heat, brown the meat well on all sides - you might have to do this in two batches. Remove and leep to one side.
    Then add a large slice of unsalted butter (about 50-75g) and melt, and then add about a kilo or so of sliced onions. Allow to cook on a very low heat with the lid on for about 30 minutes, until very soft, and then cook for a further 10 minutes with the lid off and the heat up slightly until they become a rich brown (but do not allow them to burn!). During this last stage, preheat your oven to a low heat, 130 or 140 degrees C.
    To then pan then add a small bottle of stout (approx 250ml), and the same quanitity of beef stock or even water, a couple of bay leaves and a tablespoon of brown sugar. If you have them you could add a tablespoon of each of any or a combination of a few of the following - red wine vinegar, mushroom ketchup, fish sauce, worcestershire sauce - all will add depth of flavour and piquancy.
    Then add your pieces of brisket, cover with a very tight fitting lid (if your lid doesn't fit snugly, clamp a sheet of foil onto the pot with the lid) and place in the oven for anything from 2-4 hours, until the meat is very tender and a sharp knife or skewer will pass though it with no resistance. The onions will collapse into the stock and form a rich, thick gravy. Check from time to time that it doesn't look too dry - add a dash of water from the kettle if you think it is.
    Cut into 4 large chunks and serve with the gravy with boiled or mashed potatoes, or dumplings (I'd cook these in a separate pan, but cook them in beef stock), and boiled carrots and peas! Horseradish sauce might be nice as well.
    The cooking times are a bit approximate and lengthy, so I'd cook it in advance, maybe cook it the day before you plan to eat it - it will taste even better for it. Just allow to cool before placing in the fridge, removing it a good half an hour before heating it - to reheat it, a good 3/4 of an hours on the same low heat will bring it back up to serving heat.


    Another way is a Sichaun way I've done it recently with stock, spring onions, ginger, Sichuan chilli bean paste, Sichuan peppercorns, soy sauce, Xiaoxing wine, star anise and black cardamom, for about 4 hours. We had the leftovers last night, and it was stunning.
     
  6. This is exactly how we do it except I will use beer (bitter or stout) or wine instead of the water if I'm feeling extravagant
     
  7. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    Here's how you do it, amd it's sublime.
    Sean th meat well with a mix of salt, pepper. garlic powder and dried hebs. Frsh garlic and fresh herrbs don't work as well. Smother it with a libreral mix of mustard and horseraddish sauce the roast on a slow heat (under 150 deg C) for 4 hours or more on top of an onion you've sliced to act as trivet
    Use a meat thermometer to tell you when it's ready. 140 suits me.
    And then you forget about all about eating it as a conventional meal. You turn it into sandwiches to die for.
     
  8. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    I like the sound of that, MM. Might have to try it.
     
  9. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    Do you know, I can't believe how much Firefox is making me out to look like an idiot. Believe me, I was sober when I made my post, and it all read ok before I clicked "post"
    I couldn't go back to IE though. Drove me round the bend wqith the time it took.
     

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