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Bring back programming

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by mathemaniac, Jul 19, 2011.

  1. A number of people recently have been getting worried that there is no programming in the ICT syllabus (apart from Logo, which most people skip over). Now someone is doing something about it. See http://www.electronicsweekly.com/Articles/2011/05/26/51140/in-depth-raspberry-pi-the-computer-on-a-stick.htm or search for 'raspberry pi'. Anyone else missing their BBCs/Spectrums/C64s?
     
  2. A number of people recently have been getting worried that there is no programming in the ICT syllabus (apart from Logo, which most people skip over). Now someone is doing something about it. See http://www.electronicsweekly.com/Articles/2011/05/26/51140/in-depth-raspberry-pi-the-computer-on-a-stick.htm or search for 'raspberry pi'. Anyone else missing their BBCs/Spectrums/C64s?
     
  3. rubikwizard

    rubikwizard New commenter

    No.
    I still use them! In fact was using a C64 in class today.
     
  4. I'm not sure if this topic is a rally call or just an affirmation. I've been teaching programming as part of ICT units for many years now. I even teach them VBS through PowerPoint.....
     
  5. djphillips1408

    djphillips1408 New commenter

    Sorry what people are that then? So are you doing statistics with your KS3 classes? Are you discussing calculus with your KS4? Perhaps matrices with your KS5 ones?
    Just because we don't do programming does not mean that the stuff we do is simplistic or beneath the kids.
    I think you will find that those people with "worries" are those who have their own agendas or vested interests. Me I am quite happy with the way things are thanks very much
    Oh and as for the pi, it's a gimmick with little practical use outside a small niche of interested students, if you think for one moment that you will be able to use it with a whole class of kids then you are deluded.
     
  6. I'm not as anti-programming as Djp seems to be (mind you, surely you have to do some with the macros in Units 2 and 4 of the WJEC Level?) but to be honest, the pi stick seems a bit *****.
    Even the kids that might have some interest in it would rather hack your network or someting similarly real-World.
    Any way, djp, can't you get your super-talented pupil to develop a pi-stick simulator for the IPhone?
     
  7. I can't quite make up my mind whether the Pi is a modern version of the ZX80 (i.e. the forerunner of something that had a major effect on society) or simply a clever widget that will be forgotten in a couple of months. It's not a PIC chip equivalent, although you could probably do some rather fancy robotics with it. If someone could come up with a way of creating 3D VR with it that might give it some commercial impetus. When it comes to programming, I'm afraid I'm a bit of a crumbly, having been weaned on Basic, Fortran, Cobol and Forth, so programming macros doesn't seem quite the same.
     
  8. ... if that can be done via USB on the Raspberry Pi: that thread refers to the BeagleBoard.
     
  9. Actually, it is. I know you don't. I know there are other teachers who don't. But in a lot of schools it is simplistic and beneath the kids. They aren't learning anything much, they are pushed through the OCR type courses.
    Actually, I agree. All it is really is Linux running on an ARM chip which is ..... nothing new at all. (Looking at the chip engineering, it's going to cost more than £15 IMO).
    It kind of misses the point a bit though. If I was doing this I would produce something that was interpreted and gave instant feedback - something like STOS with an improved language. If they want to produce a machine which is an up to date version of the home computer boom technology, then why not actually do it.
    Amusingly, it will launch with two versions called "Model A" and "Model B".... sound familiar ?


     
  10. I think its easy to think that teaching with programming is something we should be focusing on with older learners - but with visual programming tools in eg Kodu http://fuse.microsoft.com/page/kodu.aspx and Scratch http://scratch.mit.edu/ we can engage and enthuse learners from a much earlier age - and there's nothing quite like a game and a bit of fun to enable children to move BEYOND the simplistic and to stretch themselves.... seeing the POINT of programming is half the battle.
     
  11. Can only steer down the middle here.
    The Pi is for ***; end of.
    I try to include programming in my schemes, where I can, but for <u>ICT Students</u> it is NOT NECESSARY.
    I can program well so it suits my vanity to include it in SOME schemes of work.
    The likes of the delusional, antideluvian reactionaries(e.g. Auti) who delude themselves that programming has any place for the ordinary ICT student are nothing more than a distraction.
    Contributions re: programming should be preface with a warning; 'Computing bores only'.
     
  12. Can I quote you on that for my CV ?

     
  13. If you could program well you'd understand what was wrong with VB6.
     
  14. I agree with Spiderwebb about the visual programming tools. I had a brilliant afternoon with my Year 5 class today, seeing what they could work out on Scratch. We got from no knowledge to programming bouncing basketballs with silly sound effects in an hour and a half and quite a few are desperate to go home and download it so they can continue at home. Brilliant for teaching logical thinking, and they were loving the idea that they were actually computer programming. I do think all children should get the chance to try simple programming out, so they gain some understanding of how programs work as well as developing their logic, and for those who end up being properly keen, surely we should be giving them the chance to develop their skills and interests through secondary school and beyond - it is one of our biggest creative industries, after all.
     
  15. Complete the petition, here: http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/15081
    It says:
    <h1>Teach our kids to code</h1>
    Responsible department: Department for Education

    Start teaching coding as a part of the
    curriculum in Yr 5. If it can be introduced as a part of the central
    curriculum in Year 5, then by the time those kids are drawn up through
    the education system, there would be far less of a disparity between the
    sexes &ndash; and maybe even an increased number of young people with an
    ability to manipulate open data, relate to code and challenge each other
    to design and build the digital products that we have not even begun to
    imagine. Year 8 is too late, we are losing the female coders and we
    need this generation to help us code a better country.


     
  16. Let me just finish the statement... "Me I am quite happy with the way things are thanks very much...I'm complacement about the wider state of ICT education because I get 4 GCSEs from my year 9s with the OCR Nationals; as a result I am heralded as a brilliant genius of teaching and learning. My students are fully engaged because Flash is so wonderful and creating animations is part of a balanced modern education." There are hundreds of HoDs like you DJP; Nero singing whilst our ICT-Rome burns. I'm too tired already from two weeks back to critique the twaddle on this thread. S o d ya! (Yes I am juvenile).


     
  17. Tosha

    Tosha New commenter

    DJP,
    if I am right you work in a boys grammar, a good deal of your students will take STEM degrees, you may not be able to provide them with an introduction to programming but they will benefit from an understanding of it.
     
  18. djphillips1408

    djphillips1408 New commenter

    Erm I do 1 GCSE equivalent and start it in year 10. I am no genius of teaching and leaning, I just get off my **** and make a contribution rather than like you *** about the wrold around me whilst hiding behind a pseodnym on here. My students are not fully engaged, most of them are bored by unit 1 of the Nationals. I don't teach flash anymore at all.
    I do hope that deals with your insight into my world. However you are far from juvenile but I do wonder why you found it necessary to post as you do. I mean a grown man/woman deciding to use multiple IDs to post bile, what on earth makes you so angry with the world that you must post in such a manner?
     
  19. djphillips1408

    djphillips1408 New commenter

    Yes I do work in a boys grammar - Borden Grammar, Sittingbourne. I don't know what a STEM degree is. Maybe 2 or 3 in a cohort of 120 would benefit. You're right I can't support them, because I have no interest and no knowledge. We are however investigating letting a small number do the GCSE off their own back in their own time. Oh and by small number I mean 1, just to see if it is possible...
     

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