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Bright pupil, but behaviour issues?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by alwayslearning, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. alwayslearning

    alwayslearning New commenter

    Dear Tom
    Please help! I am a primary school teacher and am almost at the end of my tether with a child. She is year 1 and has an IQ of 170, making her very intelligent. At the start of the autumn term she was a little 'wild', hiding under tables, wanting to die, spitting at children, showing her pants to children, running around the classroom etc. But, with a home school log, weekly parental meetings and offering rewards if she listened, worked with her peers and completed her work, things calmed down.
    However since Christmas she is a nightmare! The home school log has little or no effect, she isn't motivated by rewards anymore and really seems to know how to press my buttons. When I ask her do do something, she does the opposite and looks at me as she does it. Her work is only completed if there is a threat of delaying her snack or lunch and she smerks when she is making the wrong choices. I know this sounds awful, but she isn't popular in class and I can understand why because she annoys people.

    If I put on a professional head I know I need to reward her, nurture her social skills etc, but I am bloody frustrated with the fact that she knows exactly what she is doing and seems to thrive on me getting cross. Her mother is less supportive as the girl has her wrapped around her finger.HELP!
     
  2. alwayslearning

    alwayslearning New commenter

    Dear Tom
    Please help! I am a primary school teacher and am almost at the end of my tether with a child. She is year 1 and has an IQ of 170, making her very intelligent. At the start of the autumn term she was a little 'wild', hiding under tables, wanting to die, spitting at children, showing her pants to children, running around the classroom etc. But, with a home school log, weekly parental meetings and offering rewards if she listened, worked with her peers and completed her work, things calmed down.
    However since Christmas she is a nightmare! The home school log has little or no effect, she isn't motivated by rewards anymore and really seems to know how to press my buttons. When I ask her do do something, she does the opposite and looks at me as she does it. Her work is only completed if there is a threat of delaying her snack or lunch and she smerks when she is making the wrong choices. I know this sounds awful, but she isn't popular in class and I can understand why because she annoys people.

    If I put on a professional head I know I need to reward her, nurture her social skills etc, but I am bloody frustrated with the fact that she knows exactly what she is doing and seems to thrive on me getting cross. Her mother is less supportive as the girl has her wrapped around her finger.HELP!
     
  3. Blimey! Makes me glad I teach KS2. In my class, she'd be staying in under my rule of 'you waste my time and I will waste yours'!
    Is that not feasible in Y1? My daughter was kept in in Y2 to complete work or redo poor work.
    Sounds like you're doing all the praising and rewarding - maybe time to get tough?
    What does your Head/Deputy recommend you do with her?
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Sorry high IQ or not this isn't normal behaviour and I would be speaking to the SENCO and looking for a CAMHs referral not doing a log.
     
  5. alwayslearning

    alwayslearning New commenter

    could really do with some help ..................please[​IMG]
     
  6. loodle1

    loodle1 Occasional commenter

    Is there a G&T programme she can get involved with? All this intelligence needs channelling and at the moment the energy seems like it is being spent on finding new ways to be naughty! What is the policy in your school for gifted children? She probably needs an entirely different approach to the other children if her IQ is that high. I'd talk it over with the SENCO or gifted and talented coordinator if you have one. Good luck![​IMG]
     

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