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Brexit?

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by percy topliss, Jun 23, 2018.

  1. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    The power to appoint and dismiss the Prime Minister
    The power to appoint and dismiss other ministers.
    The power to summon, prorogue and dissolve Parliament
    The power to make war and peace
    The power to command the armed forces of the United Kingdom
    The power to regulate the Civil Service
    The power to ratify treaties
    The power to issue passports
    The power to appoint bishops and archbishops of the Church of England
    The power to create peers (both life peers and hereditary peers).

    Its hard to believe that the Queen may actually have to take over the Country to restore good Governance! Remember all the Army and Civil Servants swear loyalty to the Queen and not the government first!

    Maybe we get to sing the third verse of the national anthem again!
     
  2. percy topliss

    percy topliss Occasional commenter

    I guess that Feb 31 may be correct in what is written down, historically, but does anyone really think that this would happen? In the 30's when the King wanted to marry a divorcee and again the 50's with Princess Margaret and Townsend it was the Royal Family that bowed to the politicians not the other way round.

    Provocatively,

    Percy
     
  3. miketribe

    miketribe Established commenter

    Britain has an unwritten constitution. It is modified year by year through conventions arising from accepted practice. NONE of the prerogatives listed above has been exercised in a couple of hundred years. Victoria did block the appointment of an atheist divorcé by Gladstone, and monarchs certainly have the right to meet with and advise prime ministers. All the other "powers" are non-existent.
     
    percy topliss likes this.
  4. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    Just glad I am living in China for the next 18 months.
     
    ToK-tastic likes this.
  5. norwichred

    norwichred Occasional commenter

    But you’re missing all the fun! :). It’s most entertaining watching the news at the moment......:)
     
    spanboy likes this.
  6. spanboy

    spanboy Occasional commenter

    ...I like the 14 million offered to Seabourne (?) to operate the 'no-deal' ferry service from Ramsgate despite them having no ferries. You couldn't make it up! :)
     
  7. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    Since I live in China how to I get my slice of the 50 million pounds a year the UK government gives out to this poor underdeveloped country.

    Britex is just another excuse for the UK government to waste money.
     
  8. percy topliss

    percy topliss Occasional commenter

    smallest-container-ship.jpg
     
    spanboy likes this.
  9. spanboy

    spanboy Occasional commenter

  10. percy topliss

    percy topliss Occasional commenter

    Well, just over a month since the last post and just over a month until the UK sheds itself of the yoke of the EU. It would appear that the fan is become spattered, and politicians are running for the hills, or the Independent Group in this instance, will the world end? Will Fred and Tina from Scunthorpe no longer be able to wallow in Sangria in Benidorm for two weeks in July? More to the point who the hell are Nissan? Sunderland voted by 2/3 to leave the EU so do the denizens of that fair city deserve to be unemployed now, and possibly for ever more ? Will life just go on and Mrs May still be PM in 2022?

    Exciting, eh?

    Questioningly,

    Perce
     
  11. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    what does make me laugh, is after all this farce, backstabbing, in-fighting within parties etc, they then have to go and negotiate new trade deals with the rest of the world to replace what we have already. i still wonder if those brexidiots still think they are going to get the fantastic trade deals promised. the rest of the world is laughing at the UK...and rightly so.

    i happened to be talking to a South African farmer the other day (yeh i know...strange life). he was part of some sort of farming association, and we got talking about this, and the potential negotiations. he said, in his words, "the UK's negotiating position will be......... on their knees, greased up, begging for it not to hurt to much"...... it did make me chuckle.
     
    tb9605, yasf, Teachallover and 2 others like this.
  12. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    The French farmers have just realized that they sell 800 million euros worth of vegetables, meat, milk, wine, fruit and disgusting runny cheese to the UK.

    Where else can the cheese eating surrender collaborators sell their products, Italy, Spain, Greece or Ireland.

    Germany exports 700,000 cars to the UK per year, I don't think the Americans will want to buy them with fraudulent emissions software.

    South African farming is going the same way as Zimbabwe with the redistribution of land. Look at the fall of the Rand over the last 20 years, its approaching Monopoly money status. SA cant even keep all its lights on and has rolling power blackouts due to lack of investment.

    The Britex situation is a bit like nuclear MAD, if one side strikes first the retaliation will kill them aswell.

    Unfortunately Teresa May is no Margaret Thatcher when it comes to negotiating with Europe.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2019
  13. yasf

    yasf Occasional commenter

    Funny you should say that - the US is the number 1 importer of German cars.
     
  14. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

  15. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    [QUOTE="percy topliss, Will Fred and Tina from Scunthorpe no longer be able to wallow in Sangria in Benidorm for two weeks in July? Perce[/QUOTE]

    I don't think Fred and Tina will have a problem, though they may have to obtain a visa. Mrs M and I have Spanish 'residencias' dating back twenty years and our documentation says 'permanent resident', so hopefully we shall not be deported back to Wigan. The more pressing concern for us is medical care. If the current reciprocal arrangement between Spain and the UK is scrapped we may have to become health tourists. Not good for us (the Spanish system is vastly superior to the British NHS) and not good for the UK which will have to cope with droves of returning geriatrics.
     
  16. miketribe

    miketribe Established commenter

    I don't think Fred and Tina will have a problem, though they may have to obtain a visa. Mrs M and I have Spanish 'residencias' dating back twenty years and our documentation says 'permanent resident', so hopefully we shall not be deported back to Wigan. The more pressing concern for us is medical care. If the current reciprocal arrangement between Spain and the UK is scrapped we may have to become health tourists. Not good for us (the Spanish system is vastly superior to the British NHS) and not good for the UK which will have to cope with droves of returning geriatrics.[/QUOTE]
    Or you could just apply for Spanish nationality... after 10 years as a legal resident, you are entitled...
     
  17. amysdad

    amysdad Established commenter

    I've always maintained that many Brexiters won't actually understand the key consequences of what they voted for until they go on holiday this year - so let's see.....

    Fred and Tina depart from Lincolnshire - the Brexit hotbed - on their annual holiday to Benidorm. This year, they're driving - they had booked a flight back in January, but there still hasn't been an air treaty agreed to allow flights from the UK to the EU, so their airline cancelled the flight in May. Fortunately, they managed to get a ferry crossing, for about £1000, so off they go.

    They reach the junction of the M20 and M25, only to hit a tailback from there to the Channel Tunnel. The Government's plans for a big extension of Operation Stack have failed, so not only are the car parks full but the road is blocked too. Gradually, they make their way to Dover, turning a journey which should take 2 hours from the M25 into one of nearer 8.

    They go through passport control OK on the UK side, but hit a problem when they get to the French side - they don't have a visa. Fortunately this can be done online, so Tina fires up their laptop - using their phones as the mobile hotspot. She applies online, but has to wait until the confirmation comes by email. This takes several hours, during which time they watch a bit of Netflix. It's not until they get home that they find, because there are roaming charges for data again, this has cost them another £200 in data charges alone.

    So, off they go. Unfortunately, they are stopped again as part of the usual random French police checks - the gilets jaunes are up to their tricks again. Fortunately, Fred remembered that he would need a new International Driving Permit before he left - but he forgot to get the green card insurance for his car. Another quick phone call and email later - more data charges - he has the PDF document, the policeman is happy and off they go again.

    The drive through France is fairly uneventful - "Whoever said Brexit might be a problem? Fake news..." said Tina, as they drove past Perpignan on the way to the Spanish border. They don't even notice the fact that they've passed into Spain, thanks to France and Spain both being part of the Schengen area. Unfortunately, things don't go so well just north of Barcelona. Someone runs into the back of Fred's car as they wait at the tollbooth on the motorway. Tina is fine, but Fred has a bit of a sore neck. "Best just go to the hospital and get it checked out," he said. Unfortunately the Guardia Civil have other ideas. Frank has handed over his UK licence and his IDP, but what he didn't know is that France and Spain require different versions of the IDP - and the one he has isn't valid, meaning that he's now been driving without insurance. A fine beckons.

    Meanwhile they head to the hospital, EHICs in hand as always. Fred gets to the hospital, gives them the EHIC, only to be reminded that the UK has left the EU and these are no longer valid. Does he have any additional health insurance, or travel insurance, the receptionist asks?

    On they way out of the hospital, having paid with his credit card (fortunately, they still work) Fred gets a phone call. His car is damaged, and it will take about three or four weeks to repair. Unfortunately the insurance won't pay out because of the IDP problem, so Fred and Tina have to leave their car in Spain and pay for their own flight from Barcelona - or at least, try to......
     
    mermy, percy topliss and lottee1000 like this.
  18. rouxx

    rouxx Lead commenter

    I don’t know about your part of Spain, but certainly the Valencia region is concerned that the silver pound will return to the UK because of this and is hastily putting out information to reassure those who have settled that they will have access to medical services. I haven’t read the details as it doesn’t apply to me, so it might just all be hot air!

    By the way, having seen parents through terminal illnesses in Spain, yes, the health care is far superior to the UK. Not so regarding personal care though as they do rely on relatives to provide this to a greater extent.
     
  19. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    The 'silver pound' is looking rather tarnished to those of us whose pensions are paid in that shaky currency. When we moved to Spain year-round in 2006 a quid bought us one-and-a half euros. Now it's not much better than parity. (That whirring sound in the background is Maggie Thatcher twirling in her tomb). Mike Tribe's suggestion of applying for Spanish citizenship is our personal backstop.
     
  20. spanboy

    spanboy Occasional commenter

    "...a quid bought us one-and-a half euros" - yep, I remember clearly the change over from potatoes to euros :) - the opening rate was 1GBP = 1,66 EUROS!
     

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