1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

BRAND SPONSORED PHSE RESOURCES

Discussion in 'PSHE' started by cazza0104, May 24, 2012.

  1. I hope you don't mind me infiltrating your forum - I work for a marketing agency, but I am also a mum with an interest in PHSE.

    I have wondered for some time now why brands do not sponsor/produce phse teaching materials or send educators into schools. I have looked for evidence online and found nothing, although I do remember reading something about a bank (Natwest?) holding tutorials on personal finance in schools.

    I feel very strongly that video game companies (e.g. Sony) or Facebook could produce guidelines and tutorials that could be taught as part of PHSE. Screen addiction, privacy concerns and bullying online are constantly in the news and I"m sure parents would welcome support from the companies themselves on the safest and healthiest way to use these new technologies. Discussing issues highlighted by the brands themsleves with their peer group will help drive the message home far more effectively than a nagging parent can.

    This can of course apply to many areas of the PHSE course - e.g Dove producing materials re: body image.

    Maybe there are too many hoops to jump through? Do the government want to keep any kind of commercial message out of teaching? Is it just too difficult for them to get approval to produce this kind of thing?

    I would really appreciate your thoughts!
     
  2. I hope you don't mind me infiltrating your forum - I work for a marketing agency, but I am also a mum with an interest in PHSE.

    I have wondered for some time now why brands do not sponsor/produce phse teaching materials or send educators into schools. I have looked for evidence online and found nothing, although I do remember reading something about a bank (Natwest?) holding tutorials on personal finance in schools.

    I feel very strongly that video game companies (e.g. Sony) or Facebook could produce guidelines and tutorials that could be taught as part of PHSE. Screen addiction, privacy concerns and bullying online are constantly in the news and I"m sure parents would welcome support from the companies themselves on the safest and healthiest way to use these new technologies. Discussing issues highlighted by the brands themsleves with their peer group will help drive the message home far more effectively than a nagging parent can.

    This can of course apply to many areas of the PHSE course - e.g Dove producing materials re: body image.

    Maybe there are too many hoops to jump through? Do the government want to keep any kind of commercial message out of teaching? Is it just too difficult for them to get approval to produce this kind of thing?

    I would really appreciate your thoughts!
     
  3. feelinhappy2day

    feelinhappy2day New commenter

    think its more of an money issue. The Dove self esteem thing we had in school was good (esp for free) but not sure what DOVE got out of it as - they paid a supply agency for a supply teacher to come in and deliver the course. again it was good but something that we could have done ourselves. There was no expert (unsure what you would make an an expert in this) and the supply lady (although lovely) was reading the materials as she did the powerpoint. There was NO evidence that it was from DOVE (and no advertising about the product) so maybe it is a Government thing?
    I think it would be a great idea for facebook and others to do some others to do bits and bobs and help young pupils and maybe this is something suggesting to them would work.
     
  4. j_pink

    j_pink New commenter

    I asked myself this question when writing an oral health lesson plan. Our kids do not know how, when and why we brush our teeth. Consequently our region has the worst cases of tooth decay.
     

Share This Page