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Brain dead so need help plz!

Discussion in 'Geography' started by occold25, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. occold25

    occold25 New commenter

    After a long day, I could use a bit of help as my brain is just not working? How would you explain the following to GCSE students:

    * Why you would expect the percentage of pebbles to be greatest at the bottom of the beach?
    * Why you would expect the largest pebbles at the bottom of the beach?
    * Why you would expect the amount of vegetation to increase as you exit the beach and travel inland? (connected to marram grass)

    Thanks in advance for any help in answering the stupidly easy questions!
     
  2. elder_cat

    elder_cat Established commenter

    Disclaimer: I'm not a Geography teacher, so this is based on common sense/logic, rather than subject knowledge, so I could be wrong...:)

    * Why you would expect the percentage of pebbles to be greatest at the bottom of the beach?

    The pebbles are carried by waves in towards the beach.
    The action of the waves causes the pebbles to come into contact with one another.
    Over an extended period of time larger pebbles will become smaller pebbles.
    The continuous action of pebbles contacting one another eventually produces sand.
    Sand is lighter than pebbles, so the sand is moved further up the beach by the waves than the pebbles. Therefore, over time the ratio of sand to pebbles increases, the further you go up the beach.


    * Why you would expect the largest pebbles at the bottom of the beach?
    The waves will move the lighter pebbles further up the beach than the heavy ones.

    * Why you would expect the amount of vegetation to increase as you exit the beach and travel inland? (connected to marram grass)

    Marram grass has specialised and developed to be able to grow on the beach, where it has little competition from other plant species.
    Presumably Marram Grass has a root structure and nutritional requirements that can cope with the harsh environment of a beach location, whereas other plant species do not.
    Other plant species require areas covered with something other than sand, in order to establish themsleves and be able to get the nutrients they need to survive.
    The further inland you travel, the more likely it is you will find areas suitable to support other species.
     
    install and phlogiston like this.
  3. frangipani123

    frangipani123 Lead commenter

    i'm not a geography teacher either though many moons ago I did do a geography degree.

    This might help:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/geography/coasts/depositional_landforms_rev1.shtml

    It explains that in times of high energy eg a storm, larger rocks are deposited further up the beach. Waves break at the shoreline and through attrition break up the rocks into pebbles.

    Re the vegetation, it needs an appropriate environment in order to survive and so particular plants will be closer to the shoreline as they have evolved to cope with wind and saltwater. The variety of plants (I think) will increase as you move away from the shoreline, depending on the environment, for example there may be large areas of sand dunes with limited veg.
     
    install likes this.
  4. freckle06

    freckle06 Lead commenter

    From the BBC:

    The material found on a beach varies in size and type as you move further away from the shoreline. The smallest material is deposited near the water and larger material is found nearer to the cliffs at the back of the beach. Large material is deposited at the back of the beach in times of high energy, for example during a storm. Most waves break near the shoreline, so sediment near the
    water is more effectively broken down by attrition.

    Sandy beaches have gently sloping profiles and shingle and pebble beaches are steeper.

    Therefore the larger pebbles/sediment is found nearer the cliff/away from the shore, whilst smaller sediment is found closer to the shore as it is rolled about in the waves so is therefore eroded by attrition.


    Not really sure what you mean by this. Depends on your beach - if there’s a berm there probably isn’t the greatest amount of pebbles by the shore - are there destructive if construvtibd waves? Suggest you want to relate this to locates examples - if you’re near a coast use what’s nearby.

    If you want to pm me I can give you located examples and probably photos from hat would help explain.
     
    install likes this.

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