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Boy who just will not write ......how to help?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by takethatno1fan, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. takethatno1fan

    takethatno1fan New commenter

    How can I motivate a Y3 boy who just will not write? He seems to have a phobia about writing. He also has quite severe behaviour problems, and pushing him to write can be a trigger for an outburst.
    When we were doing a writing task in class this week, he wouldn't even draw a picture of the scene he was describing, saying he was rubbish at drawing. I acted as a scribe for him, so we did get his ideas down, but how can I help him in the long term?
    Any suggestions gratefully received.
     
  2. takethatno1fan

    takethatno1fan New commenter

    How can I motivate a Y3 boy who just will not write? He seems to have a phobia about writing. He also has quite severe behaviour problems, and pushing him to write can be a trigger for an outburst.
    When we were doing a writing task in class this week, he wouldn't even draw a picture of the scene he was describing, saying he was rubbish at drawing. I acted as a scribe for him, so we did get his ideas down, but how can I help him in the long term?
    Any suggestions gratefully received.
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Can he write or is this the root of his phobia

     
  4. takethatno1fan

    takethatno1fan New commenter

    I think he can write (just taken over a new class), he could orally segment the word 'cash' and write it in a phoneme frame, but once he realised what he had done, he stopped and refused to do any more. That's when I scribed for him.

     
  5. Assuming you have done all of the fun, interactive, talking stuff (drama) etc, it's a problem of behaviour. Don't scribe for him. Make him write or discipline him (keep him in at break time).

    He sounds lazy! And if he has a phobia - then he'll just need a push to get over it.


     
  6. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    How come you don't have the low down on him from previous teachers and home?

    Sometimes a special book and a special pen can make all the difference, but if he really struggles this is not going to be the answer. Some one to one help from a trained volunteer?
     
  7. In my grade 4 classroom (I'm from Canada) so this is for 10 year olds, I have some students who have difficulty getting the fantastic idea from their head to the paper. I currently have 4 laptop computers for those children to use. Many times you can buy them refurbished or as a donation from friends who have upgraded and have a perfectly good laptop sitting around. I've supplied each of those students with a memory stick and all their written work goes onto it so that I can check their work without having to print it all off and using paper up. I've found that the laptop takes some getting used to and there is a need for some training on the students' part but once that is over, they can use it readily.
    Good luck
     
  8. I have seen talking cans working well with children who find concentration/focussing difficult,they can usually speak very well, dictate a sentence at a time and then write it, but it can sometimes be a little disruptive to others in the class.
    For confidence I used a brilliant tool years ago when I had a full time class, each child had an exercise book for private writing. I made a point of saying that it was totally private, and to write what they like, they could copy anything from the environment, make lists, do grown up joined up writing (long strings of loops etc)... whatever. For a few weeks I REFUSED to look at anyone's book, reiterating the privacy aspect. The children did this writing for 10 mins straight after lunch, so providing a good routine to settle down. Eventually I did start to look at the writing, IF they wanted me to, I had a box for them to put them in, gardually after a week or so everyone was putting their book into the box, even the very reluctant writers. It gave a massive insight into the childrens interests, gave them confidence,and when given free choice for good behaviuor they would choose this, often the 10 mins SILENT working would overrun as I was engrossed in a task too. The good thing about this is that good writers also get to express themselves, I had one very able boy who wrote 3 books full of one continous story!
     
  9. I suspect there is far more to this than meets the eye.
    I expect that this boy can barely write and has not had enough experience with structured, cumulative writing - perhaps handwriting.
    It is premature for everyone to talk in terms of 'be harsh', 'be consistent' or whatever - because we simply don't have enough information about this boy's skills, capabilities, issues.
    Any pupil who refuses to do something and displays extreme behaviour is more likely to have some underlying 'something' going on than sheer laziness or habit.
     
  10. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Oh I agree which was why I suggested one to one time with someone experienced to start with. Hats off to any teacher who manages to get to the bottom of this one in a 30:1 situation. But I really did mean also as a parent that if it was "merely" a case of laziness, habit, or obstinacy I would be very happy with the "harsh" approach. Not ideal maybe, as something that really made him "itch to write" would be better, but better than a prolonged period of continuing to refuse to write in any shape or form.
    It's key that you do get to the bottom of it though. It's really starting to matter by year 3 isn't it? Wouldn't this be something you could rightly refer to the SENCO to take a look at?
     

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