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Boris Johnson has no intention of renegotiating Brexit deal, EU told

Discussion in 'Personal' started by monicabilongame, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    I'm sure some posters on here will be delighted

    https://www.theguardian.com/politic...G5vghaBqQnRBvKebstyRTqBQJD8JpOgSLKeLGkQdRYnFA

    Boris Johnson has no intention of renegotiating the withdrawal agreement and a no-deal Brexit is his “central scenario”, European diplomats have been told, amid hardening evidence in Westminster that the government is expecting to crash out of the EU.

    Brussels diplomats briefed following a meeting between the prime minister’s chief envoy and senior EU figures in Brussels said that Britain’s refusal to compromise was understood to have been clear to those attending.

    Instead David Frost, the government’s new chief Europe adviser, is said to have sought discussions on how negotiations could be reset after the UK crashes out on 31 October.

    “It was clear UK does not have another plan,” a senior EU diplomat said of the meetings with Frost. “No intention to negotiate, which would require a plan. A no deal now appears to be the UK government’s central scenario.”
     
  2. LondonCanary

    LondonCanary Lead commenter

    It is not an option

    (9)On10April2019, the European Council agreed to a further extension to allow for the ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement by both Parties. Such an extension should last as long as necessary and, in any event, no longer than31October2019. The European Council also recalled that, under Article50(3) TEU, the Withdrawal Agreement may enter into force on an earlier date, should the Parties complete their respective ratification procedures before31October2019. Consequently, the withdrawal should take place on the first day of the month following the completion of the ratification procedures or on1November2019, whichever is the earliest.

    (12)This extension excludes any re-opening of the Withdrawal Agreement. Any unilateral commitment, statement or other act by the United Kingdom should be compatible with the letter and the spirit of the Withdrawal Agreement, and must not hamper its implementation. Such an extension cannot be used to start negotiations on the future relationship.

    https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/XT-20013-2019-INIT/en/pdf
     
  3. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    I thought the EU said it wouldn't renegotiate?

    Or did I misunderstand?
     
    needabreak, nomad and LondonCanary like this.
  4. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    At a meeting of the European Council, Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European Commission, said all 27 EU leaders were “unanimous” that there should be no renegotiation of the deal, and that “nothing new” came out of discussions on it at the meeting. He had previously said the EU’s position was “crystal clear”.

    Talks on the withdrawal agreement closed at the end of last year and the EU has since split up the negotiating team, promoting the treaty’s main author, Sabine Weyand, and putting her as the top civil servant in charge of the EU’s trade negotiations in general.

    As far as I am aware the only renegotiation which can take place is regarding the non-binding political declaration (on the shape of the long-term future relationship).

    Renegotiating the withdrawal deal has never been an option for Johnson.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2019
    FormosaRed and artboyusa like this.
  5. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    So the EU has said it won't renegotiate and the UK government has to prepare to move forward on that basis as the deal can't pass parliament.

    Well... OK...
     
  6. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    Ah yes, but Boris promised he would renegotiate the deal - before he got elected that was. Why bother lying?

    And there are other ways to avoid crashing out
     
    slingshotsally likes this.
  7. dumpty

    dumpty Star commenter

    Barnier is right to say no more talking as he means under the agreement (above) that is his agreed instruction.

    If any member state soon asks for the talks to re-open and they can get support, Barnier simply says 'I am now instructed to talk'.

    I cannot blame the EU for standing firm though. They don't want a leaving nation to find things easy and they certainly had every right to believe the HoC would poodle as it does and did and help them stop Brexit.

    However, that was under May and with Bercow allowing votes to stop it.

    Now it is all much more uncertain. My take is it will all kick off in September and the EU will wait to see if Boris loses a no confidence vote no matter what.
     
    lexus300, T34 and FormosaRed like this.
  8. LondonCanary

    LondonCanary Lead commenter

    Right now the only one is for Parliament to approve the Withdrawal Agreement.
     
  9. bajan

    bajan Occasional commenter

    Being a bit dim here but what will Britain actually gain or lose by a 'no deal' Brexit. Does anyone actually know? Genuine question.
     
  10. LondonCanary

    LondonCanary Lead commenter

    It means there will be no 2 year transition period during which future trading and other relationships could be established. Also a period in which the Irish border issue could be resolved.
    Instead we become a third country overnight with no special relationships with the EU.

    It's ironic that the majority of Conservatve MPs with DUP and a few Labour rebels tried to avoid a no deal Brexit. The rest took the risk of "no deal" in exchange for a GE that won't happen.
     
  11. Scintillant

    Scintillant Star commenter

    Yes. He's an absolutely massive liar. His supporters, like Trump's, appear to see that as a virtue.

    And this government is unbelievably stupid. The cabinet must be the worst collection of incompetents and chancers that there has ever been in this country
     
  12. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Yup.

    Boris isn't the only MP telling porkies!

    Corbyn claims EU will be willing to renegotiate Brexit deal at 11th hour
     
    Dorsetdreams and ilovesooty like this.
  13. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    To my understanding we'd lose access to the 50 odd free trade agreements we presently have access to through EU membership. This would be highly detrimental to those businesses that presently operate within the purview of those agreements.
     
  14. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Sometimes I think the bigoty that exists in some folks mind leads them to conclusions which are opinionated and also ill-informed.
    Many have Boris as an idiot. However, come the day comes the man.
    'He who would b e a man must be a non-conformist'
    He at least is doing what remainder May should have done and is trying to out the problem. Parliament, by a majority, voted to leave, but instead of really negotiating and being ready in what they wanted out of leaving they failed
    'Where there is no vision, the people perish: but he that keepeth the law, happy is he.
    Boris is keeping the law!
    All those who chose to lead have their followers and distractors...and history tells whether they were wise or foolish.
     
  15. Scintillant

    Scintillant Star commenter

    Yes, those that worked with him in the Foreign Office.

    And many in his own party.

    And me.
     
    ilovesooty, knitone, Dodros and 4 others like this.
  16. LondonCanary

    LondonCanary Lead commenter

    It is a fallacy to think that it is always possible to negotiate a settlement that is acceptable to both parties.
     
  17. neddyfonk

    neddyfonk Lead commenter

    If we leave with a no deal we should demand a refund due to the fact that the EU rejected all proposals and did not contribute anything positive in negotiations.
     
    lexus300 likes this.
  18. EmanuelShadrack

    EmanuelShadrack Star commenter

    I didn't see the /sarc marker at the end of your post. Something odd is going on.
     
    chelsea2, dleaf12 and LondonCanary like this.
  19. blue451

    blue451 Senior commenter

    Have just seen an interview clip explaining that a no-confidence vote will NOT, as seems to be commonly believed, lead to a GE which will be too late to stop Brexit. The fixed term parliament rule apparently states that after a NC vote, there are 14 days to form a new administration, without a GE. Maybe this is what BJ is hoping for. I still believe that he does not want to be associated with failure, either with failure to deliver or with a diasaster of a brexit. He walked away in 2016 and couldn't find a face-saving way out this time. This might just be it.
     
  20. Ivartheboneless

    Ivartheboneless Star commenter

    The losses due to a no deal Brexit have been well documented for years. (I have been asking the same question over and over since July 2016). The gains are only rumours that certain people (rich ones) who have triggered it and paid for all the fiddles, lies and electoral lawbreaking and getting away with it (though it should have invalidated the referendum) are due to make financial windfalls in some way. Meanwhile the rest of us suffer the consequences, the economy nose dives, sterling plummets, everything gets more expensive, jobs are lost, and there are food and medicine shortages, your overseas holiday doubles in price, and our exports cost 40% more putting businesses out of business (and that is just the start).
     
    monicabilongame likes this.

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