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Bootcamps a good idea?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by simon81phipps, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. Hi,

    I'm a freelance journalist. I'm writing a feature about Michael Gove's proposal to let soldiers run Pupil Referral Units.

    I would be very interested to hear from anyone who works at a PRU. Do you think it's a good idea to turn them into 'bootcamps'?

    Has anybody had any direct contact with Skills Force, the charity that employs ex-soldiers to work with 'hard to reach' children?

    Is 'hard to reach' an appropriate description?

    Lots of questions, I know!

    I look forward to your responses. If anybody wants to talk to me in person, I can be reached on my mobile 07702 742 697

    Simon Phipps
     
  2. Hi,

    I'm a freelance journalist. I'm writing a feature about Michael Gove's proposal to let soldiers run Pupil Referral Units.

    I would be very interested to hear from anyone who works at a PRU. Do you think it's a good idea to turn them into 'bootcamps'?

    Has anybody had any direct contact with Skills Force, the charity that employs ex-soldiers to work with 'hard to reach' children?

    Is 'hard to reach' an appropriate description?

    Lots of questions, I know!

    I look forward to your responses. If anybody wants to talk to me in person, I can be reached on my mobile 07702 742 697

    Simon Phipps
     
  3. In a word NO, it's a terrible idea and will only make a lot of these kids even angrier.
    Most of them respond well to being treated more like an equal...they often come from "shouty" homes, having an ex RSM bark at them will simply drive them away even more. They need positive input and tangible rewards etc.
    There was a time, in my NQT year, when I thought some of these kids did need "breaking". After six years in a very tough school my mind as definitely been changed.

     
  4. I've encountered some managers and staff from a couple of local PRU's through work recently.
    I was left with the distinct impression that they would sooner appease badly behaved children by blaming everyone else for their problems than actually doing anything about them. Despite all the investment put into our local PRU (and we are talking substansial amounts of money) they simply do not seem to be improving the outcomes for the children in their care.
    This, of course, is my limited personal experience of one system but with this in mind I'm finding it difficult to see how an ex army officer could possibly do any worse.
     
  5. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    What a refreshing point of view. It's great to see someone becoming less cynical as the years go on! [​IMG]
     
  6. I am sorry, but you are ill informed about methods of instruction and motivation in the Army. Contrary to popular belief promulgated in some of the more left wing press, soldiers are not simply 'shouted' into compliance, that will no more work with soldiers than it would with children. An RSM issuing a b*llocking is one of many techniques for instilling discipline and keeping order, sometimes a short sharp shout has the desired effect - not on evryone though. There are numerous methods employed by the Army chain of command to impel soldiers to do that most counter intuitive act - deliberatly put yourself in extreme danger when directed to - there are more carrots than sticks used in the Army, believe me.


    Give people a sense of worth, individual and team identity, reward positives and punish negatives are methods for improving behaviour and making them better people. Of course, it does take a lot of time, resources and patience. A Regimented programme might just provide the structure and sense of achievement that some of these kids so sadly lack in their home lives.


    I am convinced behavioural standards have declined in schools (as had been debated on here) so to try something different can only be a good thing - clearly not all current initiatives are working.
     
  7. I spent a year in the army before becoming a teacher and really like the experience.
    I agree with ADUX, in the army, you are not just constantly shouted at!
    Most people at my unit were very well behaved and hardly ever stepped out of line!
     

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